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Doyle - Days of Being Wild


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#1 Matt Serrins

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Posted 02 December 2005 - 06:03 PM

How did Doyle light this, specifically the interiors?

Watching the DVD, it looks like practicals and natural light in addition to the overhead top lighting that's been mentioned previously. It seems like a look that could be recreated without extensive equipment and would give freedom for camera moves. I'm aware that it may be a lot more complex and that pushing fuji (i heard 320, was that even a stock) 2 stops had something to do with it . Anyway, here are some specific questions.

Was top light bounced, or did he use soft sources? Any ideas on what he used specifically(china balls...)?

Any guess on what kind of wattage/bulb he used in the in frame practicals, and were they corrected?

Was he using sunlight (and correcting) or blasting lights through the windows?

Also, in terms of the camera moves, was it dolly or steadicam (doesn't really look handheld but maybe)?

Someone also mentioned a bunch of filters on the camera for this one? Any guesses?

Any ideas on this film and 'lighting the space' techniques in general would be greatly appreciatted. Thanks for the help.

Matt Serrins
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#2 Norbert Shieh

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 03:48 AM

This Kino essay had some info about the lighting techniques Doyle used for the film. Apart from that, not that much technical data is out there. From article's I've read, Doyle mentions that he wasn't yet in his handheld phase in "Days of Being Wild," so most of the film was on tripod/dolly. The rest of the article is linked below.

http://www.kino.com/...wild/essay.html

"LIGHTING
Much of the visual effect of the film comes through its lighting, or better, its lack of it. An amazing amount of time is spent in the dark or in the rain, or both, which leads to a slow, stylized expressivity--so similar to later films like Happy Days and In the Mood for Love--that never contains more than a modicum of narrative information and perfectly matches the mood of the rest of the film. Contrasting moments of intense light, as for example when Yuddy visits his mother?s palatial estate in the Philippines, are very powerful and seem to betoken an unreal world beyond the grasp of the characters and perhaps beyond our ken as well, since we have learned in this film that the real world is nearly always murky and difficult to decipher (a knowledge abetted by all the mirror shots that remove us even further from a direct perception of ?reality?).

Regarding the lighting, Wong has said that ?Days of Being Wild was a reaction against my first film, As Tears Go By, which was full of harsh light and neon. I told Chris [Doyle, his cinematographer and cameraman] I wanted to do a ?monochrome? film, almost drained of colour. It?s a film about different kinds of depression, and it needed to be very blank, very thin in texture. That created many problems for Chris: many filters, few lights, very hard to control focus. That?s one reason it took so long to shoot.? In fact, Wong explained to Austrian critic Andreas Ungerböck, he originally wanted to make the film in black & white but the producer wouldn?t let him. He wanted ?the light to be very weak, without contrast, as in the paintings of Edward Hopper. I didn?t want the light to disturb or to be too obtrusive.?"
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#3 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 06:25 AM

I don't see Edward Hopper's paintings as "weakly lit" or "low contrast". Strange...
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