Jump to content


Film Storage After Wrapping


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Markus

Markus
  • Guests

Posted 06 December 2005 - 04:25 PM

Hi,

I just watched the Specials on the Extended DVD of "Return Of The King". And I had to see that they burned the unused film after wrapping. I guess by unused they meant not even exposed film, and not takes that didn't get developed or used. Why didn't they give the film rolls to film schools? <_<

Btw, does all the developed film, whether used or not, get stored for "eternity"? For "The Lord of the Rings" there must enormous amounts of film. How much space would they need for it, and where to keep it?


Markus
  • 0

#2 John Pytlak RIP

John Pytlak RIP

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 3499 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Rochester, NY 14650-1922

Posted 07 December 2005 - 08:48 AM

Hi,

I just watched the Specials on the Extended DVD of "Return Of The King". And I had to see that they burned the unused film after wrapping. I guess by unused they meant not even exposed film, and not takes that didn't get developed or used. Why didn't they give the film rolls to film schools? <_<

Btw, does all the developed film, whether used or not, get stored for "eternity"? For "The Lord of the Rings" there must enormous amounts of film. How much space would they need for it, and where to keep it?
Markus



The recent trend to "bonus features" in DVD releases makes keeping unused outtakes and other footage more likely. Some may eventually be sold for stock footage. Its usually a matter of judging the potential value for "repurposing" vs. the storage cost in a vault with proper storage conditions (cool and dry).

Unexposed film is often sold to dealers of "short ends" or "recans". If they discarded it, they may have felt it had been stored improperly or was too old. At the very least, they should have sent the film to a recycler for recovering the silver.
  • 0

#3 Charles Haine

Charles Haine
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 127 posts
  • Colorist
  • New York

Posted 26 December 2005 - 10:06 AM

I think Return of the King might be a special case (and this is only a guess), in that, if I remember correctly, a large chunk of all the movies was shot on the 93, a stock retired by the time of the third film, though the final batch of '93 didn't expire until June of 05.

Since they shot all three films together back in the 90s (or whenever, years earlier), and presumably did pick-ups for RotK in Summer 04 (if they did any, which I assume they must've), that was either stock they had stored themselves for several years so that the film was from the same original batch as what they shot on, or film they bought fresh from Kodak so it was of roughly the same age as what they originally shot on.

Either way, it was a bunch of '93, which was basically unsaleable to short-ends distributors by that point, since it was retired, and just about to expire.

Why didn't they donate it to a film school? I don't know, but that's my best guess as to why the couldn't sell it. I've never heard of anyone else burning unused film at the end of a shoot, but I've never worked on a film that grossed $1billion either, and didn't need to worry.

chuck haine
  • 0


Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Opal

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Glidecam

Opal

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post