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Flo's stink


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#1 Paul Bruening

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Posted 09 December 2005 - 12:47 AM

Hey gys,

Sorry about the provacative topic title. I figured more folks would look.

The point is, flo's have a spiked spectrum. I know Kino's are tuned to better respond to the color dyes in film. But, isn't a full spectrum light better than a spiked spectrum flo? I've had so much trouble with flo's doing weird things to hair, make-up and costume color. I avoid them if I possibly can. Where I can't I add full spectrum light to the scene.

Am I nuts or have any of you had the same issues with flo's?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 09 December 2005 - 01:19 AM

Kino tubes ARE full-spectrum sources -- they have no missing wavelengths. They do have some minor spikes in green still.

See:
http://www.kinoflo.c...lmp/kf3200.html

They are just another lighting tool; I've seen plenty of period movies like "Titanic" or "Master and Commander" shot using Kino lighting and I don't particularly notice anything unusual. They DO create their own texture to the lighting and color, so I would be hesitant to have an actor step from a Kino key to a non-flo key in the same shot or sequence, although sometimes I've had to do it.

But in terms of being unable to get accurate colors because of them not being full-spectrum sources, that's not really true with Kino tubes.

Like I said, I tend to keep Kinos contained to certain sequences or locations, or just use them for fill, rather than go back & forth between one face being lit by Kinos and another not, unless in a day interior where all the soft light are Kinos and the hard sunlight is HMI's. But I'm not particularly afraid of them.

Here's a shot from the set of "Master and Commander":

Posted Image

Edited by David Mullen, 09 December 2005 - 01:24 AM.

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#3 Paul Bruening

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Posted 09 December 2005 - 01:28 AM

Hello David,

Do I understand correctly that the green spike in Kinos are designed to work in a nonresonsive color hole that already exists in film? What about the blue spike?

Interesting that they have reduced the spikes to two. Normal flos can have as many as seven.

Thanks for the link. I've never used Kinos and had incorrect assumptions about them.
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Ritter Battery

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