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K3 Loading Problem, Question


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#1 hmc4me

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 07:07 AM

Hi. I just got my k3 yesterday. I had bought 10 rolls of double pref fuji 250d from raw-stock.
I loaded a roll yesterday but it seems that the film is wound wrong on the reel. If I run the film the way the manual shows the emulsion is pointed the wrong way when I load the camera. I turned the reel around and ran the emulsion the correct way but the film does not follow the film path pic inside the camera. The film comes off the front (left) side of the reel. I ran just 1 roll and it seemed to run fine no ripped pref's or scratches. I've not had it processed yet though.
Am I missing something here? Is there more than one wind to watch out for?
I had no problems with the first roll but don't want to run anymore untill I make sure it's ok. I don't want to waste lots of film and transfer time to find out that I did something wrong.
When the film is wound on the take up reel the back side of the film should be showing correct?

The only slight problems I had was the film on the takeup reel was loose when I unloaded the camera and I lost about 10 ft of film. Is this common.

Anyone have any tips. I did read through this forum but could not find this problem.
Anyone have any Clips of the k3 at work?
Thanks
Anthony Collins
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#2 Clive Tobin

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 12:24 PM

Hi. I just got my k3 yesterday. I had bought 10 rolls of double pref fuji 250d from raw-stock.
I loaded a roll yesterday but it seems that the film is wound wrong on the reel. ...The only slight problems I had was the film on the takeup reel was loose when I unloaded the camera and I lost about 10 ft of film...


I hate to ask this but are you sure you are correctly identifying the emulsion side? I have not shot this particular film type but as a general rule the base side is very dark, and the side that has the emulsion is a lot lighter. The lighter side goes towards the lens.

If you did get film that is wound the wrong way, the supplier should make good on it. Their technicians need some additonal training, or else need to be ordered to show up for work while not drunk or stoned.

I would presume that the film may wind up loosely if the K-3 takeup is a bit on the slack side and is unable to allow for the film having a curl the wrong way owing to being reversed.
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#3 hmc4me

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 12:53 PM

you know you may be right.
I am crazy and I wasted 2 rolls of film. You would think I would know better since I did go to school a few years ago for commercial photography. Man I feel dumb. I'm sure thats why the take up reels dont wind right.
Oh well learn from my mistake.
thanks
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#4 Will Montgomery

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 04:00 PM

The only slight problems I had was the film on the takeup reel was loose when I unloaded the camera and I lost about 10 ft of film. Is this common.

Here's a quick tip: DON'T USE THE PLASTIC TAKE UP REELS that come with the camera. With age they tend to warp a little and don't take up the film properly. Use the empty metal reel from the film you just shot as your new take up reel and then do that with each new roll shot. Also, you can ask for your empty reels back after development if you want some extra. When you send film in for processing, you probably want them to prep it for telecine so they'll combine multiple rolls onto one big one. In that case they may not send back your empty metal reels unless you ask for them.

Another Tip: Order 16mm film directly from Kodak, [1-800-621-FILM (3456)] try the Vision2 250D and the new Vision2 50D and shoot outside on a nice day... you'll be amazed at the quality... play around with slow-mo too. If you're used to working with video, real film slow motion is pretty cool - shoot at 48 FPS and film water moving or leaves falling or throwing a beach ball or something.

Edited by Will Montgomery, 11 December 2005 - 04:01 PM.

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#5 Rod Otaviano

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Posted 11 December 2005 - 04:33 PM

Another Tip: Order 16mm film directly from Kodak, [1-800-621-FILM (3456)] try the Vision2 250D and the new Vision2 50D and shoot outside on a nice day... you'll be amazed at the quality... play around with slow-mo too. If you're used to working with video, real film slow motion is pretty cool - shoot at 48 FPS and film water moving or leaves falling or throwing a beach ball or something.


Oh man ... can't wait to get my K-3 back from Du-Al. They've just upgraded it to S16 and are shipping it back in a few days.

Will test these two stocks and post the video on the Internet.
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#6 hmc4me

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 07:15 PM

Thanks for the info.
I don't know what I was thinking when i loaded my camera that day. I do work at a tv station and go to work at 4 am so I must of been very tired.
I've shot lots of dv as you can guess being a camera man at a tv station.
I've only shot 2 good rolls of 16 mm and lots of super 8 so real film is still new to me.
I did go to school for commercial photography so I know my way around photography very well just not movie cameras.

I noticed the old plastic reels were crap as soon as I saw them. I'm going to transfer with cinefilm in atlanta because they are close to home. I rewound the old film I shot and ruined and got the metal reels from them and shot 2 new rolls. I am going to send them off to telecine tomorrow I think. Cinefilm said they will send back the old reels and cans if I want and I'm sure I can get some more from them aswell.

As soon as I get my footage back I'll post some good shots on my website for all to see. Don't know how much will be good. I forgot my color chart at work so I did not have one to shoot and these rolls are camera test so I can test the camera and the lenses I have.
Later
T.c.
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#7 Will Montgomery

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 10:11 PM

I forgot my color chart at work so I did not have one to shoot and these rolls are camera test so I can test the camera and the lenses I have.
Later
T.c.

While a color chart might be useful, an 18% grey card is more useful for the telecine/colorist in film. They can use that to get a neutral starting place. I've seen them at big photography stores for like $5 or you can buy a nice fancy one with a plastic case from Kodak for like $40. Next time you order film from Kodak just ask them for a grey card too.

Also for the K-3, grab a focus chart from work or make one up on your laser printer to test the lenses and camera. Sometimes K-3's have issues with the pressure plate moving and the shot going out of focus. In those cases the first frame or two of a scene might look sharp and then get blurry.
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