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Put a sticker on my camera- must get goo off


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#1 JonathanSheneman

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Posted 12 December 2005 - 09:34 PM

I put a kodak sticker on the side of my K3 - I've since removed but the area still has gooey residue on the surface (surface has tiny bubbley relief). What solvent can I use to remove all residue? Thanks.
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#2 Trevor Greenfield

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Posted 12 December 2005 - 10:32 PM

Rubbing Alcohol?
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#3 Mitch Gross

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Posted 12 December 2005 - 10:56 PM

In the US there are products like Goo-Gone and Goof-Off that are citrus based and do an excellent job of removing such residue without causing damage. They are available from places such as Home Depot or Lowes. I use them to clean shipping labels off my cases .
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#4 LovinItAll

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 09:02 AM

WD-40 works miracles! Put a little on a cotton rag and the "goo" will wipe right off.

Acetone or lighter fluid also work.
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#5 Preston Herrick

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 11:59 AM

Use Goo-Gone. Good stuff for a variety of goo removal. Goof-off is a much stronger petroleum based solvent. I used it to remove undercoating on my project car.
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#6 Daniel Stigler

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 01:58 PM

Acetone or lighter fluid also work.



Acetone is very agressive and will also remove or at least damage the paint. WD40 is a much better choice.
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#7 Erdwolf_TVL

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 04:08 PM

I put a kodak sticker on the side of my K3 - I've since removed but the area still has gooey residue on the surface (surface has tiny bubbley relief). What solvent can I use to remove all residue? Thanks.


Try heating the goo with a hair-dryer and rubbing it off with a soft but non-disintegrating object.

Hands work, but it can be painful!
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#8 Trevor Greenfield

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Posted 13 December 2005 - 09:07 PM

The heat may not be such a good idea because the bumpy covering they used on the sides of the K3 is held on with glue... and glue is not one of the Russian's strong points.
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#9 Tim J Durham

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 01:30 AM

Use Goo-Gone.
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#10 Mark Wilson

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 02:22 AM

I put a kodak sticker on the side of my K3 - I've since removed but the area still has gooey residue on the surface (surface has tiny bubbley relief). What solvent can I use to remove all residue? Thanks.

Pure peppermint oil is excellent and doesn't normally attack paint, smells pretty good, and a couple of drops on a handkerchief will do wonders for a blocked nose too :)

This is particularly recommended for getting adhesive goo off Perspex (Lucite) and similar shiny plastic surfaces.

Eucalyptus oil is cheaper but it isn't as fast-acting, although it will also do the job.
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#11 Mike Crane

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 11:47 PM

Use some sulfuric acid and sand paper. Works wonders. :lol:
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#12 JonathanSheneman

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Posted 19 December 2005 - 10:13 PM

You know what Mr.Crane? Thanks for ruining my camera and my life. I tried your suggestion of sulfuric acid and sandpaper thinking that it might work and it did I guess but it also burned a hole through the side of my camera plus I now have severe 3rd degree burns on my hands. :(

I guess I could have read the other posts or realized that happy smile on the end of your post might have meant you where joking but should I have to?

You f-cked me bad Mr.Crane.
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#13 LovinItAll

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Posted 24 December 2005 - 01:34 PM

You know what Mr.Crane? Thanks for ruining my camera and my life. I tried your suggestion of sulfuric acid and sandpaper thinking that it might work and it did I guess but it also burned a hole through the side of my camera plus I now have severe 3rd degree burns on my hands. :(

I guess I could have read the other posts or realized that happy smile on the end of your post might have meant you where joking but should I have to?

You f-cked me bad Mr.Crane.


I assume this was a joke, too. No one in their right mind would break out a bottle of sulfuric acid and start working on their camera body.

Seriously, Goo-B-Gone (or whatever you call it - I have used various "goo removers") is okay, but WD-40 is BY FAR the best substance I have ever used to remove sticker residue. Great for removing "permanent markers" like Sharpies, too (assuming the markings are on some type of plastic or glass).

Don't use it for a "personal lubricant", though. The fumes ruin the mood! :)
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#14 Hal Smith

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Posted 28 December 2005 - 11:36 AM

[Seriously, Goo-B-Gone (or whatever you call it - I have used various "goo removers") is okay, but WD-40 is BY FAR the best substance I have ever used to remove sticker residue. Great for removing "permanent markers" like Sharpies, too (assuming the markings are on some type of plastic or glass].

I've been using mineral spirits for years to take tape and sticker residue off of equipment. It works slower than Goo-B-Gone (and 3m's equivalent product) but is safe on most materials and slow can very much be a virtue working with valuable gear. If the residue is real old and hard, I soak a couple layers of cotton cloth with mineral spirits and let it sit on the residue for a while, even putting a piece of aluminum foil over that to keep it from drying out. I've used this technique extensively on high-dollar test equipment that makes film and video gear look cheap!
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