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Who processes reversal for projection?


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#1 Michael Carter

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 08:54 AM

My reversal Plus-X looks all washed out. However, 7363 Hi-Con processed as reversal projects great! Who would process Plus-X to look more contrasty?
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 09:14 AM

My reversal Plus-X looks all washed out. However, 7363 Hi-Con processed as reversal projects great! Who would process Plus-X to look more contrasty?


Most labs try to follow the processing specifications:

http://www.kodak.com....4.4.8.12&lc=en

If a reversal film looks "washed out" and was processed correctly, it may be an exposure issue. Is the issue in the highlights or the shadow areas? Can you post a few images showing the problem?
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#3 Michael Carter

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 11:03 AM

Most labs try to follow the processing specifications:

http://www.kodak.com....4.4.8.12&lc=en

If a reversal film looks "washed out" and was processed correctly, it may be an exposure issue. Is the issue in the highlights or the shadow areas? Can you post a few images showing the problem?

The lights are gray and over all the film is darker than the HC ones. Even images correctly exposed in bright sun are dull and lacking in 'punch'. None of the films have been transfered yet. I'll start doing that soon with my 3 chip miniDV cam off the wall on a sheet of typeing paper in a dark box. Some day it'll get done properly in a lab. I'll post pictures later and write more on my web.
Michael Carter

Edited by Michael Carter, 14 December 2005 - 11:05 AM.

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 12:14 PM

Plus-X reversal is a fairly contrasty film so if it looks dull & washed-out, something was done wrong somewhere.
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#5 Michael Carter

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Posted 14 December 2005 - 10:12 PM

Plus-X reversal is a fairly contrasty film so if it looks dull & washed-out, something was done wrong somewhere.

So, a roll of reversal Plus-X would look the same no matter which lab was used? There are universal standards for processing so everyone does basically the same thing? Is reversal processed any differently for telecine?
Negative plus-x is a different matter. I was told they were done for telecine and would look that way dull.
I was just wondering if it were something to deal with using reversal.

Michael Carter,
Pittsburgh

Edited by Michael Carter, 14 December 2005 - 10:13 PM.

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#6 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 06:47 AM

I never developed B&W reversal but I did tens of millions of feet of color reversal and am still doing B&W and color negative.

The first developer in a reversal process is a negative-type developer just like the one in a negative process. You make or break the contrast there. Sloppy processing can partially be recovered in telecine but if you project it really shows up.

Start by asking for a sensitometric test strip, you give the lab 5-6 feet of film and see what they make of it.
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#7 Michael Carter

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 08:44 AM

I never developed B&W reversal but I did tens of millions of feet of color reversal and am still doing B&W and color negative.

The first developer in a reversal process is a negative-type developer just like the one in a negative process. You make or break the contrast there. Sloppy processing can partially be recovered in telecine but if you project it really shows up.

Start by asking for a sensitometric test strip, you give the lab 5-6 feet of film and see what they make of it.

In the document: H-661.pdf_id=0.1.4.4.8 linked to above it says much the same thing, the first developer is important to the final look of the film.
If I ask for a sensitometric test strip is that before or after processing? After would tell me how far off or on a piece is by a standard of projection perfection. However, if before processing, would a lab change how they process reversal for just a little bit of film like 200 feet? More is involved than just slowing down or speeding up the machine, the temp would also need to be altered, right?
I think if I want reversal for projection that looks as reversal did in the old days then I'll have to do it myself or settle for Pac Lab's way.
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#8 Sam Wells

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 09:45 AM

Try sending a roll to Forde Labs in Seattle.

It's been awhile, but their B&W reversal processing was first rate when I used them, and I sent them a lot.

-Sam
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#9 Rob Featherstone

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 10:18 AM

Hi. It sounds like your film was fogged somehow.

I have had good experiences with pac lab in New York.

http://www.pac-lab.com/

-Rob Featherstone
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#10 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 01:44 PM

The lights are gray and over all the film is darker than the HC ones. Even images correctly exposed in bright sun are dull and lacking in 'punch'. None of the films have been transfered yet. I'll start doing that soon with my 3 chip miniDV cam off the wall on a sheet of typeing paper in a dark box. Some day it'll get done properly in a lab. I'll post pictures later and write more on my web.
Michael Carter


--Way back when I was in school, I was expermenting with odd stocks.
I had some Plus-X negative processed as reversal.
Your description sounds like the results I got from that.

The first developer did not process all of the silver, leaving behind enough silver to give a veil over everything.
The negative emulsion is thicker than the reversal, so it didn't dry evenly leaving water marks.

---LV
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#11 Trevor Greenfield

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 02:08 PM

Try sending a roll to Forde Labs in Seattle.

It's been awhile, but their B&W reversal processing was first rate when I used them, and I sent them a lot.

-Sam


I just used them, no complaints and their tk prep was fantastically clean.
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