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cheap prices for film?


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#1 seth christian

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 06:03 PM

where's a good website with good prices for 16mm
Kodac DX film? or any film that would be a good
soft film for music video.
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#2 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 10:43 PM

where's a good website with good prices for 16mm
Kodac DX film? or any film that would be a good
soft film for music video.

Sorry guy you have completly lost me.. the only DX film I know of is for 35mm still cameras, where there are little conductive spots on the film package so Aunt Minnie's Little camera does not have to ask her to set the film speed.

From you other posts I Take it that you are scoping out getting nto using film ot make Music videos, and are looking For the cheap way to do things....The cheap way to buy film is to get the leavings left over from Profesional productions - These are called "Short ends" You get them from dealers like "certified film" http://www.certifiedfilm.com/ and others. They buy the film that is left after a project is finished, as well as the film leftin the camera that is not long enough for the next shot, so the unused film gets put back in the can and is sold off cheap.

If you are shooting for a living, You probaly can't afford the uncertanty . Example I just respooled A roll of film from e-bay that is marked as 120 ft of Kodak 7245 onto a spool for my Filmo, but I found it had been wound on a Fuji core!

Now it may be that it was part of a 1000 ft load, and the dealer respooled it on ot the smaller size core..(1000 ft loads often come on a 3 inch core- 400ft and smaller on a 2 inch) as I think they actually use the weight to figgure out how much film is on a roll.....or perhaps the film :blink: is not what is marked on the can. ???
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#3 Brian Wells

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 10:51 PM

"any film that would be a good soft film"

Bro...

Most of the look you're after is in the lighting, not the camera or the film. Although, the non-compressed nature of film helps a ton during transfer, the look is still in the lighting, filtration, composition, camera movement, framerate, and, of course, the color correction.

Matt McDermitt shot a number of award winning music videos on DV, which landed him his gig as the director of the latest Backstreet Boys video. He's 19 years old. He built his reputation on excellent composition and a charming fixation with the Twixtor plug-in. Nobody cared that his demo reel was shot on video. It didn't even matter. People get hired because of their ideas and their skills, not because they shoot on film.

For a soft look, try a Pro-Mist lens filter.
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#4 Chris Burke

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 12:13 AM

"any film that would be a good soft film"

Bro...

Most of the look you're after is in the lighting, not the camera or the film. Although, the non-compressed nature of film helps a ton during transfer, the look is still in the lighting, filtration, composition, camera movement, framerate, and, of course, the color correction.

Matt McDermitt shot a number of award winning music videos on DV, which landed him his gig as the director of the latest Backstreet Boys video. He's 19 years old. He built his reputation on excellent composition and a charming fixation with the Twixtor plug-in. Nobody cared that his demo reel was shot on video. It didn't even matter. People get hired because of their ideas and their skills, not because they shoot on film.

For a soft look, try a Pro-Mist lens filter.


Try Fuji F-400 or Eterna 400. On the Kodak side of things try the Vision 2 500T Expression. All of these stocks are lower in constrast and saturation. Coupled with the afore mentioned lighting and filtering techniques, you should get a softer look.
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#5 certifiedfilm.com

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 04:00 PM

Hello Charles,

I appreciate you mentioning certifiedfilm.com as a source for inexpensive motion picture film stock. However, the so-called "uncertainty" of which you speak is misleading. All of the film we sell has been fog-tested and complies with manufacturer D-min readings. For more detailed information, consult this web page -> http://www.certified...tingMethods.htm

Regards,

Peter
Certified Film


Sorry guy you have completly lost me.. the only DX film I know of is for 35mm still cameras, where there are little conductive spots on the film package so Aunt Minnie's Little camera does not have to ask her to set the film speed.

From you other posts I Take it that you are scoping out getting nto using film ot make Music videos, and are looking For the cheap way to do things....The cheap way to buy film is to get the leavings left over from Profesional productions - These are called "Short ends" You get them from dealers like "certified film" http://www.certifiedfilm.com/ and others. They buy the film that is left after a project is finished, as well as the film leftin the camera that is not long enough for the next shot, so the unused film gets put back in the can and is sold off cheap.

If you are shooting for a living, You probaly can't afford the uncertanty . Example I just respooled A roll of film from e-bay that is marked as 120 ft of Kodak 7245 onto a spool for my Filmo, but I found it had been wound on a Fuji core!

Now it may be that it was part of a 1000 ft load, and the dealer respooled it on ot the smaller size core..(1000 ft loads often come on a 3 inch core- 400ft and smaller on a 2 inch) as I think they actually use the weight to figgure out how much film is on a roll.....or perhaps the film :blink: is not what is marked on the can. ???


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#6 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 10:23 PM

I appreciate you mentioning certifiedfilm.com as a source for inexpensive motion picture film stock. However, the so-called "uncertainty" of which you speak is misleading. All of the film we sell has been fog-tested and complies with manufacturer D-min readings.

Sorry if My post sounded a bit negative (no Pun intended) Peter: I am a happy customer myself! And I would not metion any firm that I felt that I could not recomend highly.

The point I was making is that if you are a 5 million dollar production, with a bank breathing down your neck, You proably will sleep easier at night with stock that comes directly from the nice folks on state street in Rochester NY! Folks in thaose shoes would buy enough stock to do their entire production from one batch and put someone in charge of making sure it is looked after.

If you are a low budget film maker, You can't take that route, and your best bet is a reseller like Peter. NOT ALL OF THEM ARE AS PICKY AS Peter. In my distant past I have gotten the wrong stock in a can, that sort of thing.

TO clarify, I have gotten nothing but great film and wonderful service from Certified film, based on what I have had processed so far.
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Tai Audio

Abel Cine