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AGFA Moviechrome 40


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#1 Steppenwolf

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 08:28 AM

Hello,
Do you think that processing an old film of AGFA Moviechrome 40, from the mid-'70's, worth the try (money and time)?
I found out that this film can be processed in the Film Rescue International, in SK, Canada.
Did anyone ever tried to process this vintage film succesfuly?

Jonathan.

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#2 Chris Burke

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 09:41 AM

Hello,
Do you think that processing an old film of AGFA Moviechrome 40, from the mid-'70's, worth the try (money and time)?
I found out that this film can be processed in the Film Rescue International, in SK, Canada.
Did anyone ever tried to process this vintage film succesfuly?

Jonathan.



Is it film that was exposed in the '70's? I don't remember the name, but I know that there are some labs out there that specialize in old film, that is probably your only shot. Good luck

chris
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 11:47 AM

Hello,
Do you think that processing an old film of AGFA Moviechrome 40, from the mid-'70's, worth the try (money and time)?
I found out that this film can be processed in the Film Rescue International, in SK, Canada.
Did anyone ever tried to process this vintage film succesfuly?

Jonathan.


It's very unlikely that film that old will produce good images, even if it was refrigerated. In most cases, the labs offering processing for these really old films (which no longer have existing processes), process the film as a B&W negative just to recover any image. So it may be worth the money and time if the film has valuable images exposed when the film was fresh, but there is no sense in using such old film through a non-standard process for anything shot today, as the image quality will be very poor.
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#4 Christian Appelt

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 03:27 PM

I agree with John. It will look rather flat and grainy, propably with a color shift.

If the film may contain personal footage like unprocessed records of your family, have it processed.
If it is just an old cartridge found in a camera you bought, better save your money. Unless you are really curious, of course... ;)
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#5 Erdwolf_TVL

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 04:45 PM

Hello,
Do you think that processing an old film of AGFA Moviechrome 40, from the mid-'70's, worth the try (money and time)?
I found out that this film can be processed in the Film Rescue International, in SK, Canada.
Did anyone ever tried to process this vintage film succesfuly?

Jonathan.


I would not bother personally.

I've head it being said that AGFA moviechrome does not age well even after timely processing.

Edited by Erdwolf_TVL, 16 December 2005 - 04:45 PM.

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#6 Steppenwolf

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 08:51 PM

I would not bother personally.

I've head it being said that AGFA moviechrome does not age well even after timely processing.


Thanks a miilion for your advices.
When I use my Super8 camera, I film only with BW Reversals. I was tempted to use one of my old Colour Films, without a second thought. This is probably learning the hard way. I'm having a collection of unused old packed Kodachrome II and Ektachrome 160 etc., but this will stay as a collection only. This Agfa Moviechrome 40 was found in a flea market in Tel-Aviv (in a small funny suitcase). Nobody knew what it was , so i got it almost for free.

Thanks again,

Jonathan.
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#7 A.Oliver

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Posted 17 December 2005 - 08:59 AM

Hi, dont waiste time and any money on moviechrome 40 or 160 stock, in a word its crap. All my 1982-3 footage on moviechrome stock is unwatchable due to emulsion fungus. I have seen images from 1986-7-8 from another two collections filmed on moviechrome, this too has suffered emulsion fungus. All my k40 and E160 images from the same era are perfect. Stick with kodak stock. Despite me always moaning about the demise of k25, kodak will always be my first choice of filmstock.
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