Jump to content


Photo

PAR 36 globes


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 BrettCarleton

BrettCarleton

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 17 December 2005 - 05:27 PM

Hello,

Does anyone know a lot about the different types of PAR 36 (650w) globes available for the Molefay?

I have looked up the following codes for the studio PAR 36:

FAY ?
FBE Narrow Dichroic 5000k
FBO narrow 3200k
FCW ?
FCX ?
DWE ?
FCT wide 3200k

However, I do not know what half of these globes do...

Does anyone know of a cross reference guide available online? I tried GE's website, but that was no help.

Thanks in advance,

Brett


www.geronimocreek.com
  • 0

#2 Phil Reilly

Phil Reilly
  • Guests

Posted 19 December 2005 - 10:31 PM

Brett:

Yes, there probably are quite a few PAR (pressed aluminized reflector) lamps in the books.
However, only 2 seem most popular in our business:

FAY narrow-ish flood, Dichroic 5000k: $45.00
FCX medium flood, 3200k: $32.50

fay.jpg
Before the days of HMI, FAY lamps were all the rage, as we didn't have to loose stops to the blue gel necessary for outdoor shooting. In fact, many guys still call ANY par 36 fixture a "fay" (i.e. 9 light fay)
Now, small HMIs have put the FAYs on the back shelf.
Hope this helps.

-PHIL
Boston
  • 0

#3 Chris Cooke

Chris Cooke
  • Sustaining Members
  • 246 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Lethbridge, AB Canada

Posted 19 December 2005 - 11:12 PM

PAR (pressed aluminized reflector) lamps

Actually a PAR is an acronym for parabolic aluminized reflector. It is a pressed reflector lamp because the glass is pressed.
  • 0

#4 Phil Reilly

Phil Reilly
  • Guests

Posted 19 December 2005 - 11:57 PM

Actually a PAR is an acronym for parabolic aluminized reflector. It is a pressed reflector lamp because the glass is pressed.

Thanks Chris,

Yes, I too, once thought it stood for parabolic. Sure enough, the reflector is parabolic in shape. Now after 15 years, I see that Osram/Sylvania defines the P in par as "pressed", not parabolic (Lamp & Ballast Catalog 2004). After giving it some thought, I decided to agree with Osram for one reason: Given that all (?) fixtures reflectors are parabolic in nature, the one thing that is unique to PARs is the fact that they are sealed beams (pressed glass). Whad-ya think?
Now I'm curious what G.E. & Phillips have to say on the topic. Thanks for the post!
  • 0

#5 Luke Prendergast

Luke Prendergast
  • Sustaining Members
  • 491 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Victoria Australia

Posted 20 December 2005 - 01:14 AM

DWEs are common in Australia in twin, 4- and 8-lights. 650w and 120v, so they are only used in series on our 240v.
  • 0

#6 Chris Cooke

Chris Cooke
  • Sustaining Members
  • 246 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Lethbridge, AB Canada

Posted 20 December 2005 - 07:16 PM

Given that all (?) fixtures reflectors are parabolic in nature, the one thing that is unique to PARs is the fact that they are sealed beams (pressed glass). Whad-ya think?
Now I'm curious what G.E. & Phillips have to say on the topic. Thanks for the post!


I just did a few little google searches and found that Osram was the only company I could find that actually called them Pressed Aluminized Reflectors. I even typed in those words ("Pressed Alumnized Reflector") into google and all I got was that PAR is an acronym for Parabolic Aluminized Reflector. I see your point but what about Fresnels, they are pressed glass. Also, PARs get most of there output off of the reflector, which is why they are so efficient. Fresnels have a fairly small parabolic reflector but if you took that reflector away, I don't think it would cut the light in half.
  • 0

#7 timHealy

timHealy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1252 posts
  • Other
  • New York

Posted 20 December 2005 - 08:10 PM

Brett:

Yes, there probably are quite a few PAR (pressed aluminized reflector) lamps in the books.
However, only 2 seem most popular in our business:

FAY narrow-ish flood, Dichroic 5000k: $45.00
FCX medium flood, 3200k: $32.50

fay.jpg
Before the days of HMI, FAY lamps were all the rage, as we didn't have to loose stops to the blue gel necessary for outdoor shooting. In fact, many guys still call ANY par 36 fixture a "fay" (i.e. 9 light fay)
Now, small HMIs have put the FAYs on the back shelf.
Hope this helps.

-PHIL
Boston


Around NY many people will call a FAY light a "nine light FAY" also to differential from single shot, and double shot FAY's some people like. Some call them a "mini brute" as opposed to a nine light PAR 64 maxi brute. in addition DWE's are the same as an FCX medium flood 3200k except they have two terminal screws to attach wiring. FAY's and FCX's just get installed and pressed into contacts on a nine light FAY. (like in the photo above). I have only seen DWE's in Wendy lights and FAY lights made by an elelctrician in California with a nice design to spin the bulbs. Mole Richardson FAY lights have to have the bulbs installed in one position so the medium flood bulbs all spread in the same direction: Horizontal. The connectors on the back of the bulbs and the lights only allow the one position. With DWE's and a little wiring, bulbs can be placed in any direction and thereby spreading the beams in all sorts of directions. Maxi brutes do not have this problem as they have a differnet connector.

All in all I personally love mini and maxi brutes. They are very easy lights to work with especially through frames, book lights, and bounces.

When I first got into the union in NY I worked on a job with a cameraman where he did things "old school". Though he was not old himself, he was using tungsten mini and maxi brutes during the day with full blue diffusion for fill light. I have to say the experience was easier than dragging around and trouble shooting HMI's all day.

Best

Tim

Edited by heel_e, 20 December 2005 - 08:11 PM.

  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Opal

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets