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Color Correcting Tungsten Balanced Film


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#1 Tim Shim

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Posted 18 December 2005 - 12:30 PM

Hi,

I'm wondering if it's possible to color correct Tungsten balanced film shot outdoors without correction filters? Just assume I was stranded in the wilderness with nothing but a camera and a roll of 200T. :P

Tim
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#2 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 18 December 2005 - 01:10 PM

No problem.
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#3 Stephen Williams

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Posted 18 December 2005 - 01:13 PM

Hi,

I'm wondering if it's possible to color correct Tungsten balanced film shot outdoors without correction filters? Just assume I was stranded in the wilderness with nothing but a camera and a roll of 200T. :P

Tim


Hi,

If you want to print it's better to use some correction like 85,85ef or LLD. If your working with a good telecine it's not a problem.

Stephen
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 18 December 2005 - 04:35 PM

Hi,

I'm wondering if it's possible to color correct Tungsten balanced film shot outdoors without correction filters? Just assume I was stranded in the wilderness with nothing but a camera and a roll of 200T. :P

Tim


Lots of latitude with the KODAK VISION2 films, so usually little problem correcting tungsten film that was exposed under daylight. But do avoid underexposure, so as to keep all of the scene information on the "straight line" portion of the film's characteristic.

http://www.kodak.com....16&lc=en#prod2

Do I need to use an 85 filter?
It is always best to expose film as accurately as possible. This allows more tolerance for any other errors that may creep into the system. If, for example, the 85 filter is not used, the film is overexposed in the blue layer. This difference could be printed out, but if the film was processed in a negative process that was fast in blue or slow in the green and red, or if the intermediates made from the negative were slightly blue, etc. then the results might be too blue, and unacceptable.


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rebotnix Technologies

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Metropolis Post

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

CineLab

Glidecam

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Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Technodolly