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grainy look through view finder


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#1 Alex Jones

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Posted 19 December 2005 - 10:17 PM

I have cleaned the ground glass inside my Krasnogorsk and also cleaned the mirror shutter but when I look through the view finder it still looks very grainy and with an orange/yellow tint! Is the grain there to act as a focus mechanism sort of thing? (I'm very new to 16mm) Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Alex. P.S I cleaned it with nail varnish remover soaked on a cotton bud tip! Have I done wrong? Also is what you see through the view finder exactly what is filmed? e.g the orangy colour I see WILL be the colour that is captured on film?...or is that a separate entity unto itself!
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#2 Joe Gioielli

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Posted 19 December 2005 - 11:22 PM

Mine is just the same. It won't effect the picture. These are issues of the viewfinder. If you look though the lens you will see no grain and no yellow.

It is my understanding you are correct about the ground glass, If you google the camera, you can find an english manual online.

Joe
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#3 Will Montgomery

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 12:53 AM

Is the grain there to act as a focus mechanism sort of thing?

Actually, I'm not sure if that was the intention, but it will allow you to adjust the focus of the viewfinder... once that "grain" is sharp, then focus the lens.

I recently had my K-3 modified to Super 16 and the tech worked the viewfinder mask to match the Super 16 field but that grain remained. Its only a problem in low light situations or in bright light when you have to use a low f-stop. You'll get used to it, and it won't show up on your film. Shoot some of the new Vision2 50D on a bright day and you'll be amazed.
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#4 rickeisenstein

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 02:21 AM

Perhaps the grain is less visible with the iris fully open.
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#5 David Sweetman

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 04:13 AM

The image you see through the viewfinder is not necissarily anything like the image you will get on film. Those grains won't be there, the colors won't be the same, the exposure of the film will not look the same as the brightness of the light you see through the lens. When the light hits the emulsion, the lens, the gate, and the film are the three things affecting your image. When you see the image through the viewfinder, you only see the effect of the lens, you don't see how the gate or film records the image. This is because the mirror shutter diverts the light away and to your eye (this is where those grains of dirt come in.) And, of course, you have to get the film processed before you can tell how the image came out. Experienced DP's are renowned for their ability to know what an image will look like before they get it processed. Unlike my first film shoot a while back, where I just threw it together and prayed for any kind of image. But it's fun to learn and they say it will come with experience.
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#6 Mark Dunn

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 04:37 PM

The grain is quite intentional. It's called ground glass and is to give the eye something to fix on for focusing. 35mm SLRs used to have something similar until the Japanese figured out the much brighter microprism arrangement. But the Russians stayed with ground glass, which is rather dim by comparison, and of course with the mirror shutter you have to look through the stopped-down iris, which is even dimmer.

Oh, and don't clean the mirror too often! It's front-silvered and quite fragile.
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#7 Dominic Case

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 05:46 PM

The grain is quite intentional. It's called ground glass

Hey there's an opportunity here for a new range of accessories.

You could get different interchangeable ground glasses with different degrees of grind (like coffee beans?) to match the film emulsion you are loading. Coarser ground glass for faster filmstock.

Oh, and don't clean the mirror too often!

More precisely, don't do it. Ever again. Certainly not with acetone and cotton buds. Air and a soft brush if it gets dusty, that's all.
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#8 Alex Jones

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 06:38 PM

Hey there's an opportunity here for a new range of accessories.

You could get different interchangeable ground glasses with different degrees of grind (like coffee beans?) to match the film emulsion you are loading. Coarser ground glass for faster filmstock.
More precisely, don't do it. Ever again. Certainly not with acetone and cotton buds. Air and a soft brush if it gets dusty, that's all.



Thanks for all the advice (from everybody)...believe me, I won't be using acetone ever again. Alex.
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