Jump to content


Photo

broadcast safeness


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 DOsborne

DOsborne
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Student
  • NYC

Posted 20 December 2005 - 03:55 AM

Hi,
I'm shooting an HD production this summer (my thesis for film school) and I'm wondering if I should worry about being broadcast safe during shooting. Clearly I won' try to have very many things over 100 IRE but sometimes it happens in the highlights and sometimes it's during an otherwise perfect take. Should one err on the side of being underexposed or address issues of broadcast safeness in post? Sometimes I want things to be blown out.

I would assume that stepping down minor overages in post would be the way to go, am I wrong?

I assume it results in another generation of the original footage due to rendering the changes right?

Is maintaing broadcast safe levels required for printing to film? Are there different standards for that?

thank you for your help.
  • 0

#2 Phil Connolly

Phil Connolly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 377 posts
  • Director
  • London

Posted 20 December 2005 - 06:04 AM

Hi,
I'm shooting an HD production this summer (my thesis for film school) and I'm wondering if I should worry about being broadcast safe during shooting. Clearly I won' try to have very many things over 100 IRE but sometimes it happens in the highlights and sometimes it's during an otherwise perfect take. Should one err on the side of being underexposed or address issues of broadcast safeness in post? Sometimes I want things to be blown out.

I would assume that stepping down minor overages in post would be the way to go, am I wrong?

I assume it results in another generation of the original footage due to rendering the changes right?

Is maintaing broadcast safe levels required for printing to film? Are there different standards for that?

thank you for your help.


Hi

I wouldn't worry about being broacast safe during shooting as it can be addressed during the grade. You want to record as much imformation as possible to tape, to give you as much grading headroom as you can get. As long as your not clipping the whites, still holding information - you can go a few % over. A waveform monitor on the set, can be useful to make sure your not clipping

In post, any grading will re-sample the image and in some ways degrade it, but it would be very difficult to try and avoid grading on a drama project - even if you are trying to get the image as close as possible in camera.
  • 0

#3 DOsborne

DOsborne
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Student
  • NYC

Posted 20 December 2005 - 10:53 PM

Great, thank you so much for the help. This is a great forum, I'm planning on shooting with the HVX200 and a 35mm lens adapter so maybe I can offer some feedback about it in a couple months.
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

CineTape

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks