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exposing for bleach bypassing techniques


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#1 Olivier Egli

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 04:50 AM

hi there
i have a hard time to remember about this one...
to expose for a bleach bypassed negative that will afterwards go to telecine for music video processing in post it is quite obvious that i will try to keep my highlights sorta low in order to avoid horrible or too massive burn out as the silver halide does not get washed out in the process, but what if you go for a print instead? does that reverse the situation?
it would be handy to know this....anyone got an idea? can i rely on my normal and custom keylight measurements or does it all change then?
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 07:38 AM

hi there
i have a hard time to remember about this one...
to expose for a bleach bypassed negative that will afterwards go to telecine for music video processing in post it is quite obvious that i will try to keep my highlights sorta low in order to avoid horrible or too massive burn out as the silver halide does not get washed out in the process, but what if you go for a print instead? does that reverse the situation?
it would be handy to know this....anyone got an idea? can i rely on my normal and custom keylight measurements or does it all change then?


Hi,

A search of the archives would be very useful to you, its a question asked every few months.

Basically you should underexpose the negative. You should do tests with the stock and the Lab you intend to use. 1 stop underexposure is a good starting point.

Stephen
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 11:18 AM

If you're doing the bleach-bypass to the negative, you underexpose to compensate for the increase in density that occurs when leaving in the silver -- regardless of whether you make a print or not.

If you're doing the bleach-bypass to the print, you can expose the negative normally.
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#4 Dominic Case

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 06:05 PM

the silver halide does not get washed out in the process

Strictly, it's silver that isn't removed, not silver halide. The function of the bleach is normally to convert exposed and developed silver back to silver halide so that it IS washed out. Bypassing it ensures that it remains as silver, and consequently isn't removed.

I assume you are talking about bleach bypassing the negative and then making a print, but whatever you do, depends on the result you want. Bleach bypass can be used for a burnt-out, washed out, hazy look, or for a dark, blocked-up, desaturated moody look, or anything in between. The outcome is determined not just by the chemical process but also by your choice of stock, lighting, and exposure, not to mention wardrobe and design.

"Normal and custom keylight measurements" seem irrelevant except as a starting point for tests.
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