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#1 AaronMeister

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 09:06 PM

Does anybody know of any good resources for Black and White cinematography, particularly when it comes to shooting it. I'm shooting a short at the end of January which the director wants to shoot in B&W. I've only shot some B&W stills, and I'm worried about shooting his project in it. We have to work with low light levels, and quick setups. It is being shot in an art museum where he can only afford to rent it out for an 8 hour day, and available light reads averages just below a 2.0 with nothing really getting to 2.8. The museum is really expensive to rent out, and it's sucking away money from equipment to battle this. I talked about shooting with high speed primes, and potentially just bringing up general levels, but at the same time I'd like to keep contrast and separation. The museum is also very strict when it comes to lights falling on the paintings, so it seems like a challenge to keep a lot of elements within range of each other without too much falling off. I'd like to maintain contrast, but I'm very worried on how to do so under these restrictions. Once I slap any sort of filters over the lens I'm really worried as to what I'll get. It seems very foriegn to me, B&W is such a mystery. I've talked to him about using a different location where we have more time, and the restrictions aren't as high, but he's pretty adament on the space. Just his rental costs alone are so high, I really don't want to mess things up, and I'd like to deliver some top notch cinematography. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Aaron Meister
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#2 Tim Carroll

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 10:20 PM

I am certainly no expert, but when I found myself in a similar position, a cinematographer friend suggested a shoot it with Vision2 500T and make it black & white in post. I don't know what Fuji or Ilford have anymore in B&W, but in 16mm Kodak B&W negative stocks, you have 100 speed and I think Double X is 200 speed(and I think Double X is really high contrast too), so they ain't too fast. Just a suggestion.

-Tim Carroll
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#3 Will Montgomery

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 10:41 PM

There's been some talk around this forum about "Good Night and Good Luck." being shot in Vision 500T stock and made B&W in post. Beautiful film... I'd suggest this to your producer and you can use that film as a proof about how well it can work.

Even with 500T, you'll probably see less grain than with Double-X if both are lit well. But it will be a different "look;" try some tests and you'll know quickly what will work for the project.
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#4 AaronMeister

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 11:47 PM

Thanks for the advice. I was thinking about something like that, but at the same time we are finishing on film, so I don't know if that changes anything. I know that if you use color, you have to settle on a color to print with making a slight tint to it. I'll check out that film and discussion if it's still liingering around the forum.

Thanks again,

Aaron
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#5 Matthew Skala

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 11:24 AM

Also Check out THE MAN WHO WASN'T THERE, (Coen Brother's, Roger Deakins) They used the same shoot color and print on B&W technigue. There is some good info on the DVD! As far as lighting goes, I would just bring in some fill for the actors faces that will work with the available stop and bring in a back light/kick when needed. In that time frame, you wouldn't have much time for anything else.
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#6 Ole Dost

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 06:20 PM

Thanks for the advice. I was thinking about something like that, but at the same time we are finishing on film, so I don't know if that changes anything. I know that if you use color, you have to settle on a color to print with making a slight tint to it. I'll check out that film and discussion if it's still liingering around the forum.

Thanks again,

Aaron



If you need fast BW-Film, I can recommend the ORWO-Films of Filmotec. THey sell two types of BW-film: with 100 ASA and 400 ASA. Try the 400 ASA film. Both filmtypes are BW-Negative-Films. Just google the Homepage of Filmotec. It´s a german company, but the informations in their homepage is translated into English. I´ve been using this Film quite often and I really like the results. In addition -the film is not only great in means of quality; it´s also cheap.
Good luck!
Ole
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#7 Ian Marks

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 07:37 PM

Does anyone know where to obtain Orwo 16mm film in the US? Thanks.
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#8 Robert Hughes

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 04:31 PM

Plus-X is cheaper and easier to get.
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