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Lets talk some more about 7299...


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#1 Will Montgomery

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 09:30 PM

Did a search on the forum and found some interesting information, just a few things I'm still not clear on.

Is this a true statement:

The stock is processed the same way, but the telecine needs a special Kodak device that will allow you to "emulate" various stocks.

If this is true, then who has these machines and will it cost more money because of that? I thought higher-end telecine houses were already pretty good at emulating stocks if they have a good exposure to work from.

Everything I shoot is for telecine so it seems like this would be a good stock to try; but can it emulate more extreme stocks say like Kodachrome (25 or 40!) or a Tri-X or is it just there to emulate different Vision stocks? How about TECHNICOLOR! That would be fun.

With Vision2 50D I found such a beautiful daylight stock I can't imagine trying to emulate that with a 500 or 320 rated stock...
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#2 Fulgencio Martinez

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 09:52 PM

I know it is not meant for print, but how would it look if we do?
low contrast, soft but strange colors, bluish?
how many stops high and low does it hold to make it so good.
must i sell my sekonic? :D
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 09:56 PM

It has no orange color mask, so you would get an odd image, perhaps a cyan cast? And it would probably look somewhat pastel and milky.

What I heard, Kodak will supply a post house the HD box for 7299 free of charge.
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#4 Will Montgomery

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 10:57 PM

What I heard, Kodak will supply a post house the HD box for 7299 free of charge.

Seems like a pain for the post house. I guess I'll check around town and see if anyone has played with it here.

Edited by Will Montgomery, 21 December 2005 - 10:57 PM.

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#5 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 02:22 PM

It has no orange color mask, so you would get an odd image, perhaps a cyan cast? And it would probably look somewhat pastel and milky.

What I heard, Kodak will supply a post house the HD box for 7299 free of charge.


---It would have an orange cast. B/W printed on color with normal printer lights will come out with an orange cast.

Some labs will add an orange filter pack to the printer to get a normal looking B/W iamage.
I suppose they'd do this for 7299.

I wonder what 7299 would look like with a bleach bypass. Obviusly desaturated, but how much?

---LV
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#6 Clive Tobin

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Posted 26 December 2005 - 02:00 PM

It has no orange color mask...


Why do you say this? The data sheet has curves that show it definitely does have a close to normal orange mask although the density to Blue is about 0.2 (8 printer points) lower than average.

I have not heard a good explanation yet for how this or some other factor makes the stock unusable as a normal negative for printing.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 December 2005 - 07:44 PM

Why do you say this?


I was mistaken -- I thought they were resurrecting the old Primetime idea. Everyone seems to be making their orange masks thinner and thinner these days to reduce noise in scanning, so I had assumed Kodak had just gotten rid of it altogether for 7299. If it does have the mask, it begs the question as to why Kodak doesn't think it should be printed. Sounds more like the super low-con look of SO-63.
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#8 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 01:00 PM

I was mistaken -- I thought they were resurrecting the old Primetime idea. Everyone seems to be making their orange masks thinner and thinner these days to reduce noise in scanning, so I had assumed Kodak had just gotten rid of it altogether for 7299. If it does have the mask, it begs the question as to why Kodak doesn't think it should be printed. Sounds more like the super low-con look of SO-63.


The orange color of processed 7299 does NOT come from colored coupler masking. 7299 is very low in contrast, and the film has minimal color enhancing technology in its formulation, since most of the color correction occurs in the KODAK VISION2 HD Digital Processor. Printing it directly will result in a very low contrast, desaturated image. The combination of technologies used results in a very flexible production system that can emulate different film types, and that has amazing latitude and post-production flexibility.
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#9 Stephen Williams

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 01:17 PM

The orange color of processed 7299 does NOT come from colored coupler masking. 7299 is very low in contrast, and the film has minimal color enhancing technology in its formulation, since most of the color correction occurs in the KODAK VISION2 HD Digital Processor. Printing it directly will result in a very low contrast, desaturated image. The combination of technologies used results in a very flexible production system that can emulate different film types, and that has amazing latitude and post-production flexibility.


Hi,

A DP told me he was about to test a 35mm version of the film. He was hoping to grade the images on a Spirit that at the time did not have the Kodak processor.

Stephen
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#10 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 01:28 PM

Hi,

A DP told me he was about to test a 35mm version of the film. He was hoping to grade the images on a Spirit that at the time did not have the Kodak processor.

Stephen


The Kodak processor has the proprietary color correction matrices needed for optimum color reproduction, but acceptable color can be usually be obtained with normal secondary color correction tools.
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#11 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 02:03 PM

The Kodak processor has the proprietary color correction matrices needed for optimum color reproduction, but acceptable color can be usually be obtained with normal secondary color correction tools.


Hmm, if you can normalize the colors in a print, then it may make an interesting stock to combine with skip-bleach processing to get a near b&w look with closer to normal contrast...
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