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#1 hugovillasmythe

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 12:08 PM

This one seems like a job for Mr. Pytlak.
Some friends just finished shooting with Vision320-35mm. All bought directly from Kodak in Mexico under a "Government supply contract".
After developing all rolls (about 15 between 400ft, 1000ft) all of them appeared to have a "stripe" on the right side of the frame.
We had it checked and it seems it is silver nitrate buildup.
To make things more clear, the build up is very similar to the one you'd get if you layed a roll of masking tape on it's side on a lightly wet table.
Barley a line but percievable on the transfer and large enough to force both projects to "creep in" 5% into the frame.
The options were reshooting (couldn't afford it), digitally remove by hand (couldn't afford it).
All neg was developed at the same lab. This lab has been turning into a famously "fumbling shop of horrors" latley but I don't want to crucify them in advance.
How could this have happened?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 12:41 PM

Since it is silver halide (not nitrate?) build-up, you'd think you could just run it once more through the fixer/wash steps to remove it.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 03:04 PM

This one seems like a job for Mr. Pytlak.
Some friends just finished shooting with Vision320-35mm. All bought directly from Kodak in Mexico under a "Government supply contract".
After developing all rolls (about 15 between 400ft, 1000ft) all of them appeared to have a "stripe" on the right side of the frame.
We had it checked and it seems it is silver nitrate buildup.
To make things more clear, the build up is very similar to the one you'd get if you layed a roll of masking tape on it's side on a lightly wet table.
Barley a line but percievable on the transfer and large enough to force both projects to "creep in" 5% into the frame.
The options were reshooting (couldn't afford it), digitally remove by hand (couldn't afford it).
All neg was developed at the same lab. This lab has been turning into a famously "fumbling shop of horrors" latley but I don't want to crucify them in advance.
How could this have happened?


Samples of the problem should be submitted to the Kodak office in Mexico City, who will send a "field report" to Rochester to analyze the film and determine the cause of the problem. I agree with David that if there is really retained silver halide or silver from incorrect bleaching and fixing, reprocessing the film through the bleach and fixer "tail ends" will remove it.

I don't know how you would ever have "silver nitrate" buildup on a processed film.

MEXICO
Kodak de Mexico S.A. de C.V
Edificio Punta Santa Fé - Torre B
Prolongacion Paseo de la Reforma #1015 - Piso 9
Col. Santa Fe
C.P. 01376, Mexico D.F., Mexico
Phone: 52-55.1105.1730
Fax: 52-55.1105.1705

http://www.kodak.com...ctoMexico.shtml
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Wooden Camera

Visual Products

CineLab

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