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James Bond Movies Aspect ratio


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#1 Jonathan Bryant

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 05:17 PM

Was alot of the James Bond movies shot in 1.37:1 then cropped to 1.85:1 for the theaters?

Check out the Tech specs on IMDB.com http://www.imdb.com/...55928/technical
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#2 Chance Shirley

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 05:40 PM

It is common for "flat" (i.e. non-anamorphic) movies to have negatives where the full 35mm frame is exposed, creating an aspect ratio of approx. 1.37:1. When these movies are projected, the picture is masked for a projected screen ratio of 1.66:1 (traditional European) or 1.85:1 (American).

Just because the whole negative frame is exposed doesn't mean it was meant to be seen.

Here's a Wikipedia entry on the subject: http://en.wikipedia....wiki/35_mm_film
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#3 Ignacio Aguilar

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 06:26 PM

Just because the whole negative frame is exposed doesn't mean it was meant to be seen.


I believe a 1.66:1 Hard-Matte was used on those films most of the time.

Over the years, I have seen a few times the spherically-shot Bond films ("Dr. No", "From Russia with Love", "Goldfinger", "Live and Let Die" and "The Man with the Golden Gun") framed at 1.33:1 on TV and I believe those films never exposed the full negative while shooting, since some info was always lost at the sides of each frame as if some Pan and Scan had been applied. I recall that I even did once a side by side comparison between the 1.33:1 and o.a.r. presentation of "The Man with the Golden Gun" and the later showed more info at the sides and a bit less at the top and the bottom.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 06:33 PM

I believe a 1.66:1 Hard-Matte was used on those films most of the time.
Over the years, I have seen a few times the spherically-shot Bond films ("Dr. No", "From Russia with Love", "Goldfinger", "Live and Let Die" and "The Man with the Golden Gun") framed at 1.33:1 on TV


The other point to make is that most of the Bond movies were shot in 35mm anamorphic, starting with "Thunderball". Don't know why they went back to flat for those two Roger Moore ones...
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#5 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 28 December 2005 - 12:35 PM

I believe a 1.66:1 Hard-Matte was used on those films most of the time.

Over the years, I have seen a few times the spherically-shot Bond films ("Dr. No", "From Russia with Love", "Goldfinger", "Live and Let Die" and "The Man with the Golden Gun") framed at 1.33:1 on TV and I believe those films never exposed the full negative while shooting, since some info was always lost at the sides of each frame as if some Pan and Scan had been applied. I recall that I even did once a side by side comparison between the 1.33:1 and o.a.r. presentation of "The Man with the Golden Gun" and the later showed more info at the sides and a bit less at the top and the bottom.


---When I woked neg prep I had to set up a number of Bond trailers for telecine. The first three titles are definately hard matted at 1.66/1.

Incidentaly, the MGM customer rep mentioned that the Bond movies and 'Some Like It Hot' were MGM's biggest cash cows.
'Some Like It Hot' is also 1.66/1 hard matte.


---LV
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