Jump to content


Photo

Flat vs Square Gel Frames


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Barry Cheong

Barry Cheong
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Student
  • Toronto, Canada

Posted 30 December 2005 - 03:34 PM

Was just glancing through some grip catalogues and out of curiosity was wondering why they make both flat and square gel frames? It seems to me that for gel application flat seems to make more sense. Are their any benefits to square? More rigid maybe?
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 30 December 2005 - 05:27 PM

Was just glancing through some grip catalogues and out of curiosity was wondering why they make both flat and square gel frames? It seems to me that for gel application flat seems to make more sense. Are their any benefits to square? More rigid maybe?


I don't understand the difference between "flat" and "square" -- aren't all frames by definition flat, even if square? Do you mean round versus square gel frames for fitting inside a light fixture? Or do you mean the larger rectangular versus square frames that go on c-stands in front of a light? Or do you mean the thin frames that slip behind the barndoors of a light fixture versus the thicker square frame structure for gel frames that go onto c-stands?

Edited by David Mullen, 30 December 2005 - 05:28 PM.

  • 0

#3 Barry Cheong

Barry Cheong
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Student
  • Toronto, Canada

Posted 30 December 2005 - 08:15 PM

Sorry for the confusion I was meaning gel frames (like the common 3x3 and 4x4) put into c-stands in front of lights. They seem to come in either a square tube design or a flat thin design. They both seem to be used for the same application.

http://www.msegrip.c...oducts_ID=26062

vs

http://www.msegrip.c...oducts_ID=26067

Edited by Barry Cheong, 30 December 2005 - 08:16 PM.

  • 0

#4 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 30 December 2005 - 08:34 PM

Yes, they are both used for the same things, more or less. I'm not a grip, but I think it basically comes down to weight versus stability (rigidity). It's easier for the thin frames to get bent.
  • 0

#5 Kevin Zanit

Kevin Zanit
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1223 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • LA

Posted 30 December 2005 - 09:53 PM

I'm not a grip either, but the flat "blade" frames seem to be more common.

Kevin Zanit
  • 0

#6 Barry Cheong

Barry Cheong
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 62 posts
  • Student
  • Toronto, Canada

Posted 30 December 2005 - 10:09 PM

Thanks guys! I'm looking to add 1 or 2 3x3 frames. Just wanted to see if there were any preferences, things I should think about, etc..

What does the term "bamboola" refer to when talking about gel frames?
  • 0


Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Abel Cine

Visual Products