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Panavision and Kodachrome


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#1 Film Idaho

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Posted 30 December 2005 - 10:41 PM

I was wondering what Kodachrome 40 (Type A) - 7268 / 7270 would look like if shot with a Panavision Panaflex Elaine. Are there any films that have used Kodachrome as the main choice of film stock?

The look wanted: Retro contemporary flashy film.
Buget: $10,000 (USD) (Hope to this number can be achieved with the help of the Panavision New Film Maker Program.)

I think Kodachrome is be the coolest under used ever. Is Kodachrome Super 16 ready?

Peace,

Alex M.
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#2 Film Idaho

Film Idaho
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Posted 30 December 2005 - 10:58 PM

Sorry big screw up! :blink:

Use the latter one.

Peace,

Alex M.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 12:05 PM

I was wondering what Kodachrome 40 (Type A) - 7268 / 7270 would look like if shot with a Panavision Panaflex Elaine. Are there any films that have used Kodachrome as the main choice of film stock?

The look wanted: Retro contemporary flashy film.
Buget: $10,000 (USD) (Hope to this number can be achieved with the help of the Panavision New Film Maker Program.)

I think Kodachrome is be the coolest under used ever. Is Kodachrome Super 16 ready?

Peace,

Alex M.


KODACHROME 40 Movie Film 7270 is normally supplied as 16mm perforated 1R-2994, so yes, it is "Super-16 ready".

But as has been discussed here many times before, projection contrast reversal films are NOT the best choice for films that need to be transferred or duplicated, unless that high contrast "dupey look" what you want. KODACHROME type films have not been the "main choice" of film stock for feature production since the days of "monopack" decades ago, when the higher quality negative-positive system was not yet available. It has been used for some sequences where the dupey "look" was wanted (e.g., the Kung-Fu scenes in "Kill Bill 2"). From the American Cinematographer article:


Richardson did design a specifically "textural" look for a sequence in which a wizened monk helps The Bride sharpen her fighting skills. "Quentin wanted to replicate the visual generation loss in these old kung fu films- the scratches, the higher-than-normal contrast," he explains. Instead of attempting to create the effect digitally, Richardson employed a photochemical process. He began by capturing the action on contrasty Kodachrome color-reversal stock. He processed it normally, struck an internegative from the print and then struck an interpositve from that print, and so on. "We just kept making dupes and prints back and forth until Quentin was happy with the look," he says.


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Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc