Jump to content


Photo

viewing filter


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 andres victorero

andres victorero
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 412 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Spain

Posted 01 January 2006 - 03:57 PM

Hi, I´m a begginer film shooter.

Well my question is about viewing filters. I plan to buy a panchromatic and a B&W viewing filter :unsure:

what do you think about this tool? are a essential tool for shooting film? do you know some link where i can learn about how can i work with them?

thanks a lot.

Edited by andres victorero, 01 January 2006 - 04:00 PM.

  • 0

#2 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 01 January 2006 - 05:57 PM

Hi, I´m a begginer film shooter.

Well my question is about viewing filters. I plan to buy a panchromatic and a B&W viewing filter :unsure:

what do you think about this tool? are a essential tool for shooting film? do you know some link where i can learn about how can i work with them?

thanks a lot.



I really don't think they're essential for shooting color film. With experience, your eyes cooperate with your brain to recognize how certain things will expose film. I can certainly see the value in one to help your eyes and brain develop the skills of thinking like film.

B&W film, on the other hand, I think does benefit from using a filter like that. Without the benefit of color to separate things in the frame, you have to rely on value so you need to know how film will render different colors. For B&W use, a Kodak Wratten #90 works very well as a viewing filter to judge relative brightnes and costs much less than a commercial one. Just sandwich the gel between pieces of glass and it's essentially the same thing. Personally, I like the #90 wratten alone, but some people like to sandwich it with a ND.3 to help approximate the sensitivity of film, but I kind of think that's pointless to try since your eyes will adjust a-la-auto-iris anyway.

When you use a viewing filter like that (or a color one, of course), only look through it briefly. If you look through it too long, your eye will adjust to it and render the thing useless. Maybe use 5 seconds as a guideline.




Along the line of developing your eyes, I found an exercise that's been extremely helpful to me. It requires a studio or other space you can set up and leave for a while, though. I've found that the following helps:

1. set up a simple still life, including a chip chart, blacks, whites, and several colors.
2. Shoot it, get the film processed and a print made.
3. Watch the print while you can look at the still life. What's surprising in the way it rendered on film? What rendered how you expected? Just make observations.

This is really helpful in testing alternate processes like cross processing, bleach bypass, flashing, etc., too.

Edited by Christopher D. Keth, 01 January 2006 - 06:01 PM.

  • 0


Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

The Slider

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

CineTape

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS