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#1 Chris Reilly

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 06:52 PM

I am hoping to get a job soon at Panavision in Hollywood. Is there anything I should know about the "two-year-program" that they have? This is what they want me to get started on. I already have a BA in film from Brooks Institute, and am pretty knowledgeable about the basics of cinematography. Will this job help me learn more about it and possibly get me in touch with people who are actually in the industry?

-Chris Reilly
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#2 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 12:51 AM

Its been a few years since I was at Panavision (Woodland Hills) , but it was a great experience.

If you plan to work in the camera department, on your way to shooting, Panavision is a perfect place to get started meeting people and learning the gear/ watching how some of the best camera crews work.

It is a job though, although I really enjoyed it. I was there before they had this 2-year program, and I really don't know much about it. When I was there I started in shipping and receiving, stayed there for a while cleaning cases, and just generally busting my ass, while getting some of my first in-depth experience with the gear. It was a lot like a set as far as work pacing went; there was a lot of downtime, with sudden rushes of work.

I then moved into the service department (HD service), where I learned a lot about HD troubleshooting and taking the cameras apart. At the same time I was working in the same room as people like Dan Sasaki, who is one of the most brilliant and nice lens people I have ever met. He was/ is always really nice and helpful.

At around the time I was ready to move on, I would have become what was called a "puller", but just as I was going to do it, they combined that job with the "prep-techs", which is the job pretty much everyone wants because you are working so closely with the camera departments. So I got kind of lucky because I made it out onto the prep floor a lot faster than I would have. You really get your hands on the gear and learn it, and also meet a lot of good people.

At this point, just about everyone that I worked with when I was there has since moved on to fairly big shows. One of the last of the original people I knew has just moved onto the Fast and the Furious 3. Most of the others moved on to stuff like Crash, Collateral, Memoirs of a Geisha, Starsky and Hutch, etc. In other words, if you stay at Panavision long enough, you will get picked up onto a show, its just a matter of being good at your job, and sticking with it, it can take a long time.

As I said before, Panavision will best help you get into the camera department. It also helps you for shooting, because Panavision is very good to their employees in the sense that they allow you check gear out (usually for free, and without insurance). This is great for you getting stuff for your reel, etc. Also, at Woodland Hills there are stages with lots of grip/ electric stuff, so that can be very helpful.

There were a lot of employees and interns from Brooks, and they all did real well there.


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#3 Chris Reilly

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 02:26 AM

Its been a few years since I was at Panavision (Woodland Hills) , but it was a great experience.

If you plan to work in the camera department, on your way to shooting, Panavision is a perfect place to get started meeting people and learning the gear/ watching how some of the best camera crews work.

It is a job though, although I really enjoyed it. I was there before they had this 2-year program, and I really don't know much about it. When I was there I started in shipping and receiving, stayed there for a while cleaning cases, and just generally busting my ass, while getting some of my first in-depth experience with the gear. It was a lot like a set as far as work pacing went; there was a lot of downtime, with sudden rushes of work.

I then moved into the service department (HD service), where I learned a lot about HD troubleshooting and taking the cameras apart. At the same time I was working in the same room as people like Dan Sasaki, who is one of the most brilliant and nice lens people I have ever met. He was/ is always really nice and helpful.

At around the time I was ready to move on, I would have become what was called a "puller", but just as I was going to do it, they combined that job with the "prep-techs", which is the job pretty much everyone wants because you are working so closely with the camera departments. So I got kind of lucky because I made it out onto the prep floor a lot faster than I would have. You really get your hands on the gear and learn it, and also meet a lot of good people.

At this point, just about everyone that I worked with when I was there has since moved on to fairly big shows. One of the last of the original people I knew has just moved onto the Fast and the Furious 3. Most of the others moved on to stuff like Crash, Collateral, Memoirs of a Geisha, Starsky and Hutch, etc. In other words, if you stay at Panavision long enough, you will get picked up onto a show, its just a matter of being good at your job, and sticking with it, it can take a long time.

As I said before, Panavision will best help you get into the camera department. It also helps you for shooting, because Panavision is very good to their employees in the sense that they allow you check gear out (usually for free, and without insurance). This is great for you getting stuff for your reel, etc. Also, at Woodland Hills there are stages with lots of grip/ electric stuff, so that can be very helpful.

There were a lot of employees and interns from Brooks, and they all did real well there.
Kevin Zanit




Awesome, thanks...that is exactly what I want to do...THANKS!!!
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#4 Chien Huey

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 10:47 AM

Where can I find more information about this program? There's no mention of it on Panavision's website. Do you have to be a film school grad to apply?
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#5 John Schlater II

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 11:59 AM

I too am interested in learning more about this program...
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#6 Dustin Pearlman

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 09:35 PM

I too am interested in learning more about this program...


Call your nearest Panavision location. I looked into the program back in 2004 after an alumnus of the program highly recommended it as a boot camp for learning the gear/making contacts.

The following is some OUTDATED information:

(Winter 2004 - Hollywood)
$8/hr + $1 raise/8months + Full benefits
Full time M-Fri 8-6:30 (overtime after)
Expect to lift heavy cases - up to 80 lbs.
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#7 james smyth

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 12:31 PM

Kevin:

That sounds like a pretty interesting experience. Could you guess about how much time you spent in each position? It sounds like an excellent way to hit the ground running, so to speak.
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Paralinx LLC