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Film in the Desert


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#1 Robert Edge

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 01:06 PM

I'm in the planning stages of a project that would involve travelling by camel, and camping out, in a desert in the Middle East for several days. We are talking about doing this sometime between October and March, not in the soaring summer heat.

What high temperature will Kodak Vision 2 stock tolerate and for how long? Is it a problem if there is a fairly large swing between the daytime and nightime temperature and, if so, how big a swing causes a problem.

Does anyone know if there is a way to keep stock cool for a few days that does not involve carting around a generator and refrigerator? On this question, I will of course explore wilderness camping products, but if someone has a ready answer, great.

Thanks.
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#2 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 02:38 PM

Does anyone know if there is a way to keep stock cool for a few days that does not involve carting around a generator and refrigerator? On this question, I will of course explore wilderness camping products, but if someone has a ready answer, great.


Dry Ice?
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 02:58 PM

I'm in the planning stages of a project that would involve travelling by camel, and camping out, in a desert in the Middle East for several days. We are talking about doing this sometime between October and March, not in the soaring summer heat.

What high temperature will Kodak Vision 2 stock tolerate and for how long? Is it a problem if there is a fairly large swing between the daytime and nightime temperature and, if so, how big a swing causes a problem.

Does anyone know if there is a way to keep stock cool for a few days that does not involve carting around a generator and refrigerator? On this question, I will of course explore wilderness camping products, but if someone has a ready answer, great.

Thanks.


Generally, the higher speed stocks will be more sensitive to excessive storage temperatures. It is most important that you shield the film cans from direct exposure to the radiant energy from the hot sun. The cans could "cook" in a matter of minutes. For the few days that you are talking about, the film should be able to tolerate any temperatures that PEOPLE can tolerate. So simply treat the film cans like members of the crew --- give them shade, don't leave them in a hot truck or trunk, don't let them spend time under the blazing sun without protection. A portable insulated cooler chest is good, just don't leave it sitting in the hot sun. Remember, black and dark colors absorb the sun's heat, white and silver reflect most of it. Try to not let the film get hotter than about 37 Celsius (body temperature) and you should be fine for a few days exposure.
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#4 Mikael Lemercier

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 05:08 AM

hi,
a cool box can be usefull not direct sun exposed .
best..
mikael
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#5 Robert Edge

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 10:04 AM

Thanks, good news, and suggestions that we can manage. That time of year, I don't think that keeping film at body temperature or below will be a problem. The camel expert in this exercise tells me that the camels won't be keen on carrying a cooler, but she says that we may be able to rig something that won't annoy them, especially if we bribe them with fruit leather.
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 12:18 AM

Thanks, good news, and suggestions that we can manage. That time of year, I don't think that keeping film at body temperature or below will be a problem. The camel expert in this exercise tells me that the camels won't be keen on carrying a cooler, but she says that we may be able to rig something that won't annoy them, especially if we bribe them with fruit leather.


A simple styrofoam cooler and a little ice should be good enough to keep it a little cooler than the outside temp.
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#7 Matt Pacini

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 02:25 AM

I've never shot in the desert, but I did do a lot of shooting in the mountains in the summer.
I used an insulated cooler and some insulated "lunch boxes", and also I bought some of those nifty little Space Blankets (you know, the silver & gold thin mylar sheets) and wrapped them around to bounce off the sunlight.
They're super small, light, & you could easily bring several along with you. They fold down to like 1x3x2 inches or so.
MP
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#8 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 04:26 AM

hi
from my experience filming in sahara there isn't much problems with hi temps and kodak stock. avoid direct sun like usual.(i did 2 film in august over 50°c!!)
if you film close to december it can be freezing at night, but you'll have the best red sunrise and sunset
your biggest problem will be SAND !
i know a crew using a tent to load the cam that covers the loader, tripod head and camera body so you can load sand proof..
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Visual Products

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

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