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Cheap DIY 16mm -> DI -> 35mm idea?


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#1 Ian Marks

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 04:37 PM

I originally posed this question in a response to another post in a different category, but it probably belongs here:

If one had their super 16 original scanned to a high-def digital file (the way Bonolabs does) and did editing, color correction, etc., in the digital realm on a Mac G5 running Final Cut, Shake, After Effects, etc., is it crazy to think that you could do a 35mm blow up using an old Mitchell with an animation motor and very sharp, flat-field lens to shoot frame by frame off one of the gigantic 30" Apple Cinema HD computer displays? Maybe someone's even tried it? The native resolution is 2560 x 1600 pixels.
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#2 Tim Carroll

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 06:17 PM

Right up front, I don't know squat about this, but even though it sounds impressive, 2560 x 1600 pixels., that is not even close to the resolution my eight year old Nikon 35mm film scanner scans when it scans 35mm film. So if you capture that image on 35mm film, and each pixel is one constant color, you are no where near as high a resolution as the grain in the 35mm film. I may not be explaining this well, but the grains in a 35mm piece of motion picture film are much greater in number than 2560 across by 1600 down. I guess I am trying to say that the resolving characteristics of 35mm film are much higher than 2560 x 1600, so it seems to me that your final image, especially if projected in a theater, would look pretty bad. But like I said, I really do not know what I am talking about on this, just my impressions.

-Tim
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 06:26 PM

Well, that's the resolution of the typical 2K D.I. work we see today, and fine for Super-16 material -- trouble is that 2K D.I. means 2K per color channel. So a color monitor that is 2560 x 1600 pixels is actually much lower in resolution than a typical 2K D.I. But it still may produce OK, if not great, results.

Just remember that when a film image is projected onto a 50' wide screen, image artifacts like from re-photographing a screen can become quite obvious, so it's not as simple as you'd think. But it may worth testing.
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 06:34 PM

Hi,

Usually, something quoted as 2560 across in LCD terms will be 2560 complete pixels, that is groups of RGB components, and a total of 7680 discrete LCD elements.

Plus or minus those that are duff.

But as I say, I wouldn't really support the idea of using an LCD; the contrast ratio isn't high enough, and they don't offer any advantages other than geometry, assuming you use multiple exposures on a CRT to achieve perfect colour registration.

Phil
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#5 Stephen Williams

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 04:13 AM

If one had their super 16 original scanned to a high-def digital file (the way Bonolabs does)


Hi,

Recently there was a comparison test from Bono posted on CML. I don't think it would be worth going back to 35mm using that post path.

With DI's, Scanning & Telecine you get what you pay for!

Stephen
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#6 Ian Marks

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 12:30 PM

Yeah, I kind of thought it was too simple and obvious to work well, but it was an interesting thought.
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#7 Stephen Williams

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 01:40 PM

Yeah, I kind of thought it was too simple and obvious to work well, but it was an interesting thought.


Hi,

To get the best out of a telecine system, its most important to keep every piece of equipment in PERFECT condition, replacing the tube at least once a year. This is unfortunately very expensive. Therefore very cheep and very good don't usually come together in the telecine transfer business.

Cheers,

Stephen
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#8 Brant Collins

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 03:42 PM

Before cameras like the Nikon D100, I used a Nikon scanner that would scan a roll of film. I wish they would make an affordable scanner like that for movie film super-8 and 16. I have seen home made film scanners but it was too much trouble to make one. If Kodak would make a consumer motion Film scanner I could shoot film and scan myself. Would be nice. I guess if you have the time you can cut the film into strips and use any scanner with a transparency or neg adapter then import the frames in FCP. But easier to send to a place like Bono. I have not used them yet and there direct to drive transfers, are they any good?(quality, service etc.)
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#9 Stephen Williams

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 04:32 PM

But easier to send to a place like Bono. I have not used them yet and there direct to drive transfers, are they any good?(quality, service etc.)


Hi,

Look at post 5 of this thread.

Stephen
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#10 Chris Keth

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 12:26 AM

It's not a terrible idea. I bet you could get some decent results if you took the time to adjuct the contrast and color of the screen to the film you want to print to.
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