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Difference between 1014 and 1014xls?


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#1 rookie

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 08:45 PM

Do you know if it's quieter than the Canon 1014 Electronic? If not, why is the XLS so much more money?


I may be purchasing a 1014. I am a real rookie at this. Should i wait for a xls or should the 1014 be ok for a starter? I will be filming indoors low light situations and no lighting allowed.
Please advise. Thank you.
the rookie
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#2 Michael Ryan

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 09:01 PM

Hello R,

I can't remember all the differences between the two (other can fill in the gaps), but the major differnece
is the XLS is a sound camera so it does not make as much noise. Also the XLS has a variable shutter (you can switch it between 150 and 220 for low light. This is a very good feature).

There's more, but that will get you started.


Mike
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#3 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 09:13 PM

1014 XLS will be quieter, will shoot 9 fps, has an intervalometer and will be slightly faster in low light when set to 220 degree shutter. If these features are important, it may be the choice but will probably cost at least twice as much..

Generally all Canon's that start with "10" (10X zoom) are much bigger and heavier than other models. Consider the 814XLS or 814 Autozoom E. More or less the same features at about a third the size and weight.

Rick
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#4 rookie

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 09:35 PM

Hello R,

I can't remember all the differences between the two (other can fill in the gaps), but the major differnece
is the XLS is a sound camera so it does not make as much noise. Also the XLS has a variable shutter (you can switch it between 150 and 220 for low light. This is a very good feature).

There's more, but that will get you started.
Mike


Mike:
Thank you very much! Quiet is very important. It is really worth asking questions.
Rookie

1014 XLS will be quieter, will shoot 9 fps, has an intervalometer and will be slightly faster in low light when set to 220 degree shutter. If these features are important, it may be the choice but will probably cost at least twice as much..

Generally all Canon's that start with "10" (10X zoom) are much bigger and heavier than other models. Consider the 814XLS or 814 Autozoom E. More or less the same features at about a third the size and weight.

Rick


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#5 rookie

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 12:55 AM

1014 XLS will be quieter, will shoot 9 fps, has an intervalometer and will be slightly faster in low light when set to 220 degree shutter. If these features are important, it may be the choice but will probably cost at least twice as much..

Generally all Canon's that start with "10" (10X zoom) are much bigger and heavier than other models. Consider the 814XLS or 814 Autozoom E. More or less the same features at about a third the size and weight.

Rick



Thank you for all your advise!! I am glad to know about that shutter and intervalometer.
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#6 Vivian Zetetick

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 11:49 AM

There were some manuals here:

http://filmshooting....nuals/canon.php

...but they don't seem to be downloadable anymore. The 1014 is supposed to have a higher maximum frame rate setting (72fps) that the 1014 XLS when using the "slow motion" feature, making it desirable for that alone. I own an 814 Autozoom E and couldn't be happier. They are built like tanks and the image is very steady (unlike my old Sanyo). However, the lens thread on these cameras is 62mm or 72mm...I forget which...so if you're going to want an anamorphic adapter, you're doomed to looking for the large expensive kind. I love my Canon but I covet smaller cameras which can be outfitted with smaller, less expensive anamorphic adapters.
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#7 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 08:41 PM

The 1014 is supposed to have a higher maximum frame rate setting (72fps) that the 1014 XLS when using the "slow motion" feature, making it desirable for that alone.


I am pretty sure it is not 72 fps. I believe it is the same as the 814 AZ E which, according to the manual, is "about 40 fps". I would expect 1014 AZ E to be the same, or at best 54fps but will stand corrected if someone knows for sure. I would love to hear that it actually goes to 72 fps. That alone would be a reason to add one to the arsenal. (I have always found it odd that they would say "about" 40 fps since I would expect a little more certainty on their part.)

Rick
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#8 Maulubekotofa

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 09:49 PM

The top speed is dependent upon the power in the batteries. At that time, alkalines were just beginning to be developed.
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#9 S8 Booster

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 12:24 PM

if i interpret Maulubekotofa correctly the 1014e or non xlss will do aprox 54fps in slomo depending on the batt condition and the xlss about 36 fps the same.

s/hoot
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#10 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 09 January 2006 - 12:33 PM

if i interpret Maulubekotofa correctly the 1014e or non xlss will do aprox 54fps in slomo depending on the batt condition and the xlss about 36 fps the same.

s/hoot

Correct!
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#11 Tim Kirk

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 11:43 AM

hey guys this is my first post. i bought a 1014 xl last week just waiting for it to be serviced and get it back in about 2 weeks.

important to note is that you cant get xls film any more (unless im wrong) so the audio recording stuff is more or less useless.


the variable shutter is cool on the xls. i have no idea what an intervalometer is but....
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#12 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 11:55 AM

XL stands for existing light (220 shutter) , S is for sound. No, they haven't made sound film for a while. But if it's serviced, should hold sync pretty well for seperate sound recording. intervolometer means you can shoot timelapses at intervals of 1 frame per second, and up to 1 frame per minute.
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#13 Tim Kirk

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 11:01 PM

how would the xl go with separate sound recording as i plan to?
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#14 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 12 February 2006 - 05:32 PM

If your filming for the whole 2:30 duration, you'll start noticing drift after about a minute... small enough to stretch your audio to fit, and not notice any consequences. If you have some natural background noise, you shouldn't hear the camera in your scene.. for a quiet room filming/recording, you'll need to silence the camera with a barney or egg crate foam.
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#15 Tim Kirk

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Posted 12 February 2006 - 11:06 PM

If your filming for the whole 2:30 duration, you'll start noticing drift after about a minute... small enough to stretch your audio to fit, and not notice any consequences. If you have some natural background noise, you shouldn't hear the camera in your scene.. for a quiet room filming/recording, you'll need to silence the camera with a barney or egg crate foam.



what im planning involves a lot of very quiet shots. ei late at night in bed sort of thing. none of the shots should go longer than even thirty seconds but i reckon.


is a barney that thick bag that goes over the camera. if it is ive only seen on a 16 mm aaton. whats this egg crate foam.
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#16 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 09:06 PM

It can be done, but pushing it. keep a good distance from camera and mic. control the direction of the mic opposite the camera, monidirectional. would be good to do some recording tests while dry running the camera. you can find egg crate material at most retail stores... it's spongy stuff, like a big flat sponge with the surface shaped like the inside of an egg carton.
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#17 Tim Kirk

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Posted 14 February 2006 - 09:01 AM

It can be done, but pushing it. keep a good distance from camera and mic. control the direction of the mic opposite the camera, monidirectional. would be good to do some recording tests while dry running the camera. you can find egg crate material at most retail stores... it's spongy stuff, like a big flat sponge with the surface shaped like the inside of an egg carton.





oh yeh i know the stuff now. my school had it on walls for sound proofing.


thanks skratch
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