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HELP ME expose some film!!! I'm new.


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#1 wardstr

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 02:34 AM

Help.

Okay, I'm new so don't laugh!!! I just jot a 16mm automatic camera (Scoopic MS) and some new
cartridges of 16mm film (7222 kodak negative). How do I expose? The film cartridges have a box with a lightbulb marked 3200k, ei 200 and another box with a sun (?) that is blank, ei 250. Does this mean I must set the asa to 200 when shooting indoors, and set the asa to 250 when shooting outdoors? But when shooting outdoors I must also use a daylight filter? I am clueless but i do want to try my hand at this stuff. WHen do I need to apply a 80A or 85B filter?

Also, I have some spools of 7251 Ektachrome high-speed reversal DAYLIGHT film. Since this is "daylight" do i still need to use a daylight filter, or do I just set the asa to ei 400??? There is an info bar that says 3200k, Filter 80A...does mean in order to shoot this daylight film indoors I first need to install an 80A filter, then set the asa to 100???

And for the 7250 Ektachrome high-speed reversal INDOOR film: Since this is 3200k indoor film, can i just shoot this indoors without a filter...but when I go shoot outside, put on an 85B filter???

Should i even try to expose this stuff??? I read the manual to the Scoopic and it seems like this exposing stuff should be easy but then I get to the film exposure stuff and I just get lost.

Any help, tricks, or advice will be happily accepted. THanks in advance and sorry for asking such a "newbie" question.

Gene
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 03:28 AM

Help.

Okay, I'm new so don't laugh!!! I just jot a 16mm automatic camera (Scoopic MS) and some new
cartridges of 16mm film (7222 kodak negative). How do I expose? The film cartridges have a box with a lightbulb marked 3200k, ei 200 and another box with a sun (?) that is blank, ei 250. Does this mean I must set the asa to 200 when shooting indoors, and set the asa to 250 when shooting outdoors? But when shooting outdoors I must also use a daylight filter? I am clueless but i do want to try my hand at this stuff. WHen do I need to apply a 80A or 85B filter?

Also, I have some spools of 7251 Ektachrome high-speed reversal DAYLIGHT film. Since this is "daylight" do i still need to use a daylight filter, or do I just set the asa to ei 400??? There is an info bar that says 3200k, Filter 80A...does mean in order to shoot this daylight film indoors I first need to install an 80A filter, then set the asa to 100???

And for the 7250 Ektachrome high-speed reversal INDOOR film: Since this is 3200k indoor film, can i just shoot this indoors without a filter...but when I go shoot outside, put on an 85B filter???

Should i even try to expose this stuff??? I read the manual to the Scoopic and it seems like this exposing stuff should be easy but then I get to the film exposure stuff and I just get lost.

Any help, tricks, or advice will be happily accepted. THanks in advance and sorry for asking such a "newbie" question.

Gene



B&W film is slightly more sensitive in daylight than in tungsten, hence the two different ratings. You don't need color-correction filters -- it's a b&w image afterall. Just know that in bluer light like daylight, it's more like a 250 ASA stock, but in redder light like tungsten, it behaves more like a 200 ASA stock.

Daylight-balanced color film needs no filter correction in daylight (although it may need an ND filter if it's too bright to shoot because of the high ASA). It would use the blue 80A filter if you are shooting under tungsten light, in order to turn the tungsten color into daylight.

Tungsten-balanced film needs no filter correction under tungsten light, but you would use the orange 85B filter when shooting in daylight to turn the daylight color into tungsten. Again, you may also need to use ND filters if it's too bright outside for the speed of your stock to handle.
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#3 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 09:22 PM

Also, I have some spools of 7251 Ektachrome high-speed reversal DAYLIGHT film. Since this is "daylight" do i still need to use a daylight filter, or do I just set the asa to ei 400??? There is an info bar that says 3200k, Filter 80A...does mean in order to shoot this daylight film indoors I first need to install an 80A filter, then set the asa to 100???


Daylight-balanced color film needs no filter correction in daylight (although it may need an ND filter if it's too bright to shoot because of the high ASA). It would use the blue 80A filter if you are shooting under tungsten light, in order to turn the tungsten color into daylight.


... And yes, you should then set the ASA to 100 on your meter

And for the 7250 Ektachrome high-speed reversal INDOOR film: Since this is 3200k indoor film, can i just shoot this indoors without a filter...but when I go shoot outside, put on an 85B filter???


Tungsten-balanced film needs no filter correction under tungsten light, but you would use the orange 85B filter when shooting in daylight to turn the daylight color into tungsten.


And then set your meter at 250 ASA instead of 400.

You see, the orange 85 (85B) filter cuts 2/3 of a stop and the 80A cuts 2 stops.

On a meter, you usually can set sensitivity by 1/3 of a stop steps, for instance, 400 - 320 - 250 - 200 are in a 1/3 of stop progression.

cutting one stop divides sensitivity by 2 : 200 is one stop less sensitive than 400.

Happy tests and shooting !
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#4 Chris Keth

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 12:37 AM

A little rule of thumb is helpful, too. With negative stock, err on the side of overexposure if you're not sure exactly what to do. With reversal, it's best to be right on or very slightly underexposed.
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#5 Ry Kawanaka

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 01:16 AM

Are those high speed reversal stocks (7251/7252) still available?
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#6 Rik Andino

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 02:30 AM

Any help, tricks, or advice will be happily accepted.
Thanks in advance and sorry for asking such a "newbie" question.

Gene


Well a good "trick" or advice--I'd suggest
Is to get a book and read up on some the questions you have

It seems you're still unfamiliar with the characteristics of film.

This website has a list of recommended reading for those interested in learning.

I didn't even start shooting super8 until I had read several cinematography books
And learn more about the behaviors of film


I also recomend checking the Kodak website...

http://www.kodak.com...d=0.1.4.5&lc=en

It talks more about each film and there characteristics it's very helpful


Good Luck
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Aerial Filmworks

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