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Spot meter


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#1 stoop

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 11:41 AM

I' need to buy a light meter. Can I get away with just a reflective/incident meter? Or do I need a spot meter as well??

I mean if you were shooting a sunset, surely you would need a spot meter, this couldn't be done with a reflective/incident could it??

Any advice would be cool

stoop
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 01:50 PM

I' need to buy a light meter. Can I get away with just a reflective/incident meter? Or do I need a spot meter as well??

I mean if you were shooting a sunset, surely you would need a spot meter, this couldn't be done with a reflective/incident could it??

Any advice would be cool

stoop


Hi,

If your are just starting out a reflective/incident meter will be fine.

Its very important to have a good idear what the exposure should be, before you even take a reading.
On a sunny day at 24FPS with 50 asa film T16 is a good starting point.
I recently had an assistant 'Correct' my exposure reading. He was out by 4 stops as he was looking at the wrong scale on his meter! He made a complete fool of himself as he would not shut up!

Cheers,

Stephen
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#3 stoop

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Posted 09 January 2006 - 07:18 AM

Ok that's great but it doesn't really answer my question. With only a reflective/incident meter how would you meter a sunset or any sky shot or anything that is really far away???

Thanks
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 11:29 AM

I' need to buy a light meter. Can I get away with just a reflective/incident meter? Or do I need a spot meter as well??

I mean if you were shooting a sunset, surely you would need a spot meter, this couldn't be done with a reflective/incident could it??

Any advice would be cool

stoop


Hi,

Do NOT look at the sun through a spot meter ora camera, you WILL damage your eyes.

You must first decide how you want the sun to look! do you want to expose for the sun or for the background?
If you meter the sun with your incident meter the sun will be orange and the background will be dark. If you turn the meter 180 degrees, take a reading, then the background will be correctly exposed and the sun burnted out. You could expose anywhere inbetween as well. A meter is just a starthing point, you decide to how to expose.
As I said before knowing that in sunshine, 24fps with 50asa film is F16 a good starting point!

Stephen
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#5 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 03:38 PM

If you are serious about cinematography and filming in a wide variety of situations, get a spotmeter. It will allow your exposures to be placed very precisely. I recommend the very dry yet informative Minor White and Ansel books on exposure.
Stephen is absolutely correct about NOT looking into the sun with it!
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