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#1 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 01:23 PM

Hey guys I have alot of film and I was wondering what would be a good film test to shoot. I have done a couple of test before but I just wanted to know what you guys thought.
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#2 Mike Williamson

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 02:11 PM

I like to shoot an exposure test with any new stock I plan on using. For this test, get a subject and light them simply (I personally use a side light with 4:1 key to fill ratio). Now shoot ten seconds of footage of the subject properly exposed, then go a half stop under, then a full stop under, etc. Depending on what stock you're shooting, I'd go four or five stops down. Then shoot another one normally exposed, followed by overexposure in half stop increments.

The nice thing about this test is it can give you different information depending on how you print it. First, you're going to want to get a one-light print made so that you can see what this stock looks like at one stop under, two under, etc. This way, you KNOW what the film will look like at different exposures.

If you get a timed print made, you can also see what the film stock looks like if you were to rate it differently. You tell the lab to make corrections to each shot, so that each shot looks the same in terms of exposure. What it shows you is what the film will look like if it's one stop underexposed, but printed back to normal. This would be the equivalent of taking a 500 speed stock, and rating it to 1000. Also you'll see what happens when you overexpose a stop, which would be like rating 500 stock at 250, etc.

So by printing it two ways, this test can tell you a lot about the stock you're using. Incidentally, this is the test that Gordon Willis recommended that students shoot to learn how film handles different levels of exposure. Good luck!
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 05 January 2006 - 03:26 PM

Macbeth Color Checker

Lens resolution test and aspect ratio chart (e.g. Century, Schneider, ISO 12233)
http://www.graphics....33-reschart.pdf

Variety of talent flesh tones with a neutral scale for reference

"Memory Color" tabletops: variety of fruit, variety of vegetables, product packaging shots with bright "trademarked" colors like cereal boxes, film boxes, detergent packages, flower arrangements, crayons

Highlights: bridal scene with lace, backlit lace window curtains, lit lampshades with patterned fabric

Low key scene with detail in shadows

Night scene cityscape

Daylight landscape or cityscape (lots of sharpness detail)

Halation/flare: street lights, bare filament lamps, headlights

Splash of light across a neutral gray background from white to black, to look for graininess across tone scale
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#4 Chris Keth

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 12:10 AM

Lens resolution test and aspect ratio chart (e.g. Century, Schneider, ISO 12233)
http://www.graphics....33-reschart.pdf



John, could you comment on the purpose of the various parts of that chart? I get the general purpose but I'm not entirely sure what one woul be looking for with the various parts (the slightly off vertical and horizontal lines, for example)


Also, cine you came up with that chart so handily: before I go into illustrator and make my own to have around, you wouldn't happen to have a printable star-focus chart would you?

Edited by Christopher D. Keth, 06 January 2006 - 12:16 AM.

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#5 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 11:58 AM

John, could you comment on the purpose of the various parts of that chart? I get the general purpose but I'm not entirely sure what one woul be looking for with the various parts (the slightly off vertical and horizontal lines, for example)
Also, cine you came up with that chart so handily: before I go into illustrator and make my own to have around, you wouldn't happen to have a printable star-focus chart would you?


The ISO 12233 Chart was designed primarily to test digital cameras, so many of the features are designed to evaluate potential deficiencies related to sampling and compression, e.g., aliasing. Kodak often uses it to evaluate film and digital cameras. If you really want a high quality version of the chart or a full description of how is is used, you should purchase it from the ISO:

http://www.iso.org/i...ICS2=40&ICS3=10

There are various test charts available on the Internet:

http://www.imatest.com/

http://www.imatest.c...testcharts.html

http://www.lemac.com...TUTS/FOCUS.html

http://www.dsclabs.c...gn_patterns.htm

Here are some star focus charts:

http://www.filmguide...kfocuschart.jpg

http://www.mediacoll...backfocus01.gif

http://www.creativev...focus_chart.pdf
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 10:45 PM

The ISO 12233 Chart was designed primarily to test digital cameras, so many of the features are designed to evaluate potential deficiencies related to sampling and compression, e.g., aliasing. Kodak often uses it to evaluate film and digital cameras. If you really want a high quality version of the chart or a full description of how is is used, you should purchase it from the ISO:

http://www.iso.org/i...ICS2=40&ICS3=10

There are various test charts available on the Internet:

http://www.imatest.com/

http://www.imatest.c...testcharts.html

http://www.lemac.com...TUTS/FOCUS.html

http://www.dsclabs.c...gn_patterns.htm

Here are some star focus charts:

http://www.filmguide...kfocuschart.jpg

http://www.mediacoll...backfocus01.gif

http://www.creativev...focus_chart.pdf



Ok, I thought those looked like they're to see aliasing but I couldn't figure out why you'd check for that on film :)

Thanks a ton for all the links, there's some useful stuff I'm looking forward to reading.
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#7 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 06 January 2006 - 10:51 PM

Ok, I thought those looked like they're to see aliasing but I couldn't figure out why you'd check for that on film :)



Film itself won't alias, but you can get aliasing from the scanner. Definitely something to watch for with any fixed array digital sensor. Check out the recent SMPTE papers by Kodak's Dr. Roger Morton for a detailed discussion.
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#8 Chris Keth

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Posted 07 January 2006 - 05:13 PM

Film itself won't alias, but you can get aliasing from the scanner. Definitely something to watch for with any fixed array digital sensor. Check out the recent SMPTE papers by Kodak's Dr. Roger Morton for a detailed discussion.



Yeah, I know film itself won't alias, that's why I was confused. I guess this is made so you can test the whole system as well as each component of it?
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