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Zeiss mark 1 DOF chart?


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#1 Mark Williams

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Posted 07 January 2006 - 01:44 PM

Does anyone might have a link to Zeiss mark 1 Primes DOF tables Particularly the 25 and 16mm lenses?
:)

I just want it for those lenses and dont realy want to buy a samcine or Guild-kelly I have downloaded the DOFmaster But its for 35mm.. All I really want is a table for the zeiss!
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 07 January 2006 - 02:13 PM

The depth of field is determined by the focal length, f-stop, distance focused, and circles of confusion chosen. So you can use the same charts for a particular focal-length lens for 35mm or 16mm photography unless you want to use a different circles of confusion figure.
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#3 Mark Williams

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Posted 07 January 2006 - 03:19 PM

The depth of field is determined by the focal length, f-stop, distance focused, and circles of confusion chosen. So you can use the same charts for a particular focal-length lens for 35mm or 16mm photography unless you want to use a different circles of confusion figure.

Hi david

Do you mean By Using the readings for A 50mm LENS for example and then halving it for 16mm? Surely thats not an exact way of doing it?

If say you were working at F1.3 at five feet whats in focus would be less than a foot. Perhaps Im being petty in wanting to know the exact numbers In fact I guess a chart will not give me that Much accuracy either.. I just thought someone May have a Link to a site that I could write down exact settings and guess the in-between bits and Just keep a note with the Primes.. Yes it would be better to buy a calculater or use the 35mm calculator and write down relevant Settings and put that in with the Primes OR Brush up on my maths and learn to do the equations..I really wanted to keep things simple and have the basic numbers that were accurate and to hand though!
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#4 Marek Stricek

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Posted 07 January 2006 - 06:18 PM

Mark,

perhaps you can checkout following online DoF calculator http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html
use there custom circle of confusion, recommendation here ( http://www.rule.com/...fm?techtipID=26 ) says to use 6/10000" for 16mm film which is about 0.015mm
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 07 January 2006 - 07:33 PM

Hi david

Do you mean By Using the readings for A 50mm LENS for example and then halving it for 16mm? Surely thats not an exact way of doing it?

If say you were working at F1.3 at five feet whats in focus would be less than a foot. Perhaps Im being petty in wanting to know the exact numbers In fact I guess a chart will not give me that Much accuracy either.. I just thought someone May have a Link to a site that I could write down exact settings and guess the in-between bits and Just keep a note with the Primes.. Yes it would be better to buy a calculater or use the 35mm calculator and write down relevant Settings and put that in with the Primes OR Brush up on my maths and learn to do the equations..I really wanted to keep things simple and have the basic numbers that were accurate and to hand though!


A 50mm lens is a 50mm lens is a 50mm lens!

When you put it on a 16mm camera, it's STILL a 50mm lens. It still follows the same depth of field laws as it does on a 35mm camera. The only difference is that a 50mm lens is more telephoto in 16mm; the field of view is different, narrower. So you wouldn't use it at the same distance as in 35mm probably OR you'd change to a shorter focal length lens to get the same view (i.e. you'd probably be using a 25mm lens -- and a 25mm lens has more depth of field than a 50mm lens.)
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#6 Mark Williams

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 04:38 AM

A 50mm lens is a 50mm lens is a 50mm lens!

When you put it on a 16mm camera, it's STILL a 50mm lens. It still follows the same depth of field laws as it does on a 35mm camera. The only difference is that a 50mm lens is more telephoto in 16mm; the field of view is different, narrower. So you wouldn't use it at the same distance as in 35mm probably OR you'd change to a shorter focal length lens to get the same view (i.e. you'd probably be using a 25mm lens -- and a 25mm lens has more depth of field than a 50mm lens.)


OK.. So what your saying is if I use the 35mm film calculater for a 25mm lens The DOF will be the same for 16mm? and 35mm Film Lenses

The only thing that changes in the 35mm and 16mm film lens is the FOV..

SO I can use the 35mm Calculater with no alterations of readings just treat it like its a 16mm Calculator?
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#7 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 05:32 AM

OK.. So what your saying is if I use the 35mm film calculater for a 25mm lens The DOF will be the same for 16mm? and 35mm Film Lenses

The only thing that changes in the 35mm and 16mm film lens is the FOV..

SO I can use the 35mm Calculater with no alterations of readings just treat it like its a 16mm Calculator?


Hi,

For projection at the same size the DOF will be the same. For SD television you can assume 2 stops more DOF.
I have seen a Spirit telecine switched from SD to HD, the DOF reduces before your eyes!

Stephen
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#8 Mark Williams

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 06:55 AM

Hi,

For projection at the same size the DOF will be the same. For SD television you can assume 2 stops more DOF.
I have seen a Spirit telecine switched from SD to HD, the DOF reduces before your eyes!

Stephen


Makes me wonder how DV footage is blown up to 35mm and kept in Focus

Thanks Guys.. I can happily work out everything I need.. NOW where did I put that ND6 Filter ;)
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#9 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 07:27 AM

Makes me wonder how DV footage is blown up to 35mm and kept in Focus

Thanks Guys.. I can happily work out everything I need.. NOW where did I put that ND6 Filter ;)


Hi,

It does not look sharp if directly compared to 35mm.

Stephen
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#10 Mark Williams

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 07:56 AM

Hi,

It does not look sharp if directly compared to 35mm.

Stephen


I havnt seen it done.. But I imagine it would look awful.. although I have read you could film with a DV camera use a mini35 adapter have it MBd and then Blown up to 35mm Film and get acceptable results.. From What I have learned so far I just cant see thats Possible?
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#11 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 07:59 AM

I havnt seen it done.. But I imagine it would look awful.. although I have read you could film with a DV camera use a mini35 adapter have it MBd and then Blown up to 35mm Film and get acceptable results.. From What I have learned so far I just cant see thats Possible?


Hi,

Its possible, people do it all the time but usually it does not very good.

Stephen
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#12 Mark Williams

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 10:59 AM

The DOFMaster is quite a good do it yourself wheel... Although it only goes up to f2.8 Does anyone know of a similar program that goes up to f1.3?
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#13 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 12:13 PM

The DOFMaster is quite a good do it yourself wheel... Although it only goes up to f2.8 Does anyone know of a similar program that goes up to f1.3?



Hi,

You can do the maths from lens formula if you really want to. Not much will usually be tha answer at 1.3! The superspeeds are not very sharp wide open but get very sharp from T2.8 and smaller. Before you askT 4 is smaller! The reason the no's get bigger is they are fractions. 1/2, 1/2.8, 1/4 ,1/5.6 ,1/8 etc.

Cheers

Stephen
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#14 Mark Williams

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Posted 08 January 2006 - 02:39 PM

Hi,

You can do the maths from lens formula if you really want to. Not much will usually be tha answer at 1.3! The superspeeds are not very sharp wide open but get very sharp from T2.8 and smaller. Before you askT 4 is smaller! The reason the no's get bigger is they are fractions. 1/2, 1/2.8, 1/4 ,1/5.6 ,1/8 etc.

Cheers

Stephen


Managed to get a copy of some zeiss charts for the mark 1s.. They (Zeiss) use a CoC OF 0.015mm.. If anyone wants a copy please send me your e-mail.. and I will forward

Does anyone know of any films made using these lenses or TV series?
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