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good ways to move filmstock from cores to spools?


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#1 Adam Wallensten

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Posted 09 January 2006 - 06:03 AM

Hi!

I've got a krasnagorsk-3 16mm cam with the 100 ft metal spools. Since I've worked on several film productions I've managed to collect lots of film stock for free. Now my only problem is to somehow get the film from the plastic cores in the filmcans to the metal spools.

Does anyone have some good advice on how to do this easily and safe (so the film doesn't get covered with dust). I guess I could go to the nearest lab and get them to help me but it would be nice to be able to do this at home.

So far I've done it (guerilla-style) on my bed, totally covered with blankets to keep the light out. A very hot and not very practical way to do it.

I would appreciate any advice on this topic.

Thanks

Awallensten
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#2 Dominic Case

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Posted 09 January 2006 - 07:03 PM

Blankets on your bed probably aren't the most dust-free environment to do this in.

You really need a rewind bench in a darkroom. Your local lab may let you into one of their darkrooms to do this, or they may do it themselves, in which case they may charge you for their time.

If you've worked on several productions, you may be able to talk to a clapper/loader and get into a darkroom on a production.

It sounds as though you don't have anywhere at home that you could use as a darkroom (under your bed isn't going to be it, you don't want to be sleeping with a rewind bench.)

It's important that the negative is wound with reasonably even tension, or there is a risk of cinch marks and scratches as it runs off the spool into the camera.

Don't forget also that if it is single perf stock, (or if you need meaningful edge numbers (keykode numbers), then you need to double rewind the stock.
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#3 Mark Dunn

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 07:17 AM

Would a Steenbeck do, or is it a bit fierce? I ask because I got one off ebay and they're more available (and not much dearer) than rewinds.
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 08:35 AM

Would a Steenbeck do, or is it a bit fierce? I ask because I got one off ebay and they're more available (and not much dearer) than rewinds.


Hi,

If you just use the Steenbeck for the take up tension and go slowly it would probably be OK, assuming you can run the daylight spools on a Steenbeck? Remember to turn off the projection lamp! LOL

Stephen
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#5 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 10:33 AM

If you have a "walk in" closet or bathroom without a window, it would not be that difficult to seal the area around the door to prevent any light leakage to make a makeshift darkroom. Look for any light leaks after your eyes have "dark adapted" for awhile. Watch out for other light sources like cell phone status lights or illuminated wrist watches.

Remember, color camera films and panchromatic B&W films are sensitive to ANY light, so you must handle the film in TOTAL DARKNESS -- no "safelights" allowed.

Dirt picked up during rewinding or loading will result in black "shadow image" specks in the image, or worse, get caught on the camera aperture and cause a "hair in the gate".

The other pitfall of rewinding raw stock incorrectly is static marking. Be sure to electrically ground any rewinds, and use a grounding strap on your body to help dissipate static buildup. Wind slowly, and avoid "rubbing" the film, which can generate static dischages. Best to handle film between 50 and 60 percent relative humidity.
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#6 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 11:39 AM

I used to do this at night with the room's window blacked out and the house lights out. Everything was cleaned on the editing bench and used the standard rewind arms and spilt reels, turning the handle rather slowly.
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#7 Dickson Sorensen

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 12:35 PM

I once wound off spools in a 400 foot Arri mag. Don't run the film through the camera just from one hub to the other inside the mag. If you don't double wind all you edge numbers will run backwards.

Someone once told me that when Kodak puts film on spools the film is oscillated as it goes on in order to wind the edge tight to the spool sides. This would minimise the amount of edge fog when you load. DOES ANYONE KNOW IF THERE IS ANY TRUTH TO THIS?
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#8 Dominic Case

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 06:13 PM

I've heard this too: I believe it is correct. Alternate turns of film are up against each side of the spool, so there is no way light can get through to the inner turns.

If you set up a bathroom or any other space as a darkroom, in addition to checking for light leaks by eye (after dark adaptation) check with a piece of film. Leave a length of film out, emulsion up, on a bench or table, with a coin on it. Leave it there for twice as long as you expect ever to have film out (plan for fumbles, disasters etc, I'd say leave it out for half an hour). When it's processed you can easily see if there is ANY fog at all by comparison with the unexposed bit under the coin.
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#9 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 12:17 PM

Someone once told me that when Kodak puts film on spools the film is oscillated as it goes on in order to wind the edge tight to the spool sides. This would minimise the amount of edge fog when you load. DOES ANYONE KNOW IF THERE IS ANY TRUTH TO THIS?


Yes, spools are loaded on equipment that is designed to minimize any light "sneaking in" between the film roll and spool flange.
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#10 Mark Dunn

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 06:10 AM

So you'd be extra careful in loading the rewound spools in VERY subdued light? I guess if you tried wobbling the spool to get the light-trapping effect you'd grind lots of nice dust off the film edge.
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#11 Adam Wallensten

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 09:52 AM

thank you for your replies! I have now talked to a local lab and they agreed to help me with rewinding the film for free. I guess it's the best solution.
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