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#1 Daniel Madsen

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Posted 09 January 2006 - 08:53 PM

Does any one have specific 35mm SLR picture taking exercizes that they do regularly to improve shooting film?
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 02:49 AM

Does any one have specific 35mm SLR picture taking exercizes that they do regularly to improve shooting film?


Hi,

Shoot on reversal, use your lightmeter, not the one in the camera. Then you will see how good your readings are!

Stephen
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#3 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 08:17 AM

Also, learning how to setup a lighting can be improved with an SLR camera.

You can do some underxposing/overexposing tests, contrast tests etc.

Though the result would be different with a motion picture film, as well as from one stock to another, it would improve you the learning of reading an image and the relationships beetween instrument values and results on a screen.

Projecting slides allow you to analysing carefuly your results as projection time is not a problem, though, on the other hand, such tests done with a movie camera and stock would be...
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 10:47 AM

As a learning exercise, shooting with color reversal film is a better option. Shooting color negative film can be misleading, as so much depends on how the prints are made. Most paper prints are made using automatic printer exposure determination, or may even use digital correction (e.g., Kodak "Perfect Touch").
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#5 Dickson Sorensen

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 12:54 PM

Hi,

Shoot on reversal, use your lightmeter, not the one in the camera. Then you will see how good your readings are!

Stephen


Get Kodak Ektachrome 160T Professional EPT
There is also a 320T speed available.

This is a tungsten color balance film. Shoot indoors and mixed light sources you can learn a lot about how different artificial lights affect mood, skin tones etc. Shoot outdoors at night. Car head lights, street lamps etcetra. Try to keep your exposure time around a 60th of a second. This is close to what you often have in most cine cameras under normal shooting conditions.
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#6 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 10 January 2006 - 06:49 PM

Get Kodak Ektachrome 160T Professional EPT
There is also a 320T speed available.


I second that. It's the stock I use with my students as to teach them keylight and contrast tests before they do it with a motion picture camera.
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#7 dd3stp233

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 05:49 AM

Still photography is also very useful are learning composition and framing of shots.
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