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Picking a film stock


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#1 Alex Bornstein

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 07:48 PM

I've been reading some American Cinematographer magazines lately and have become confused by something...

Since different stocks are balanced for Tungsten and Daylight color temperatures, why would someone choose a Tungsten balanced stock for exterior filming? For example, in "Road to Perdition", Conrad Hall used Eastman EXR 100T 5248 for exteriors. Would it be if you wanted the daylight to have a specific look?
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#2 John Hall

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 08:35 PM

It isn't so much the case with todays film stocks, but different film stocks used to have much more unique looks to them.

Hall (great last name btw) might also have used the 100t for interiors, and wanted the same stock to do exteriors (with an 85 filter of course) for a few reasons, most likely a consistent look, or perhaps to only have to order / carry one stock.

I don't know much about 5248, but I have 400ft of it in my fridge waiting to shoot.
From this photo on off the Kodak website, the colours look to have a very muted, pastel look to them.

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Edited by John Hall, 14 January 2006 - 08:37 PM.

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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 09:56 PM

Quite a lot of DP's use tungsten stocks in daytime with a correction filter, rather than daylight balanced stocks. Part of that is just habit -- there wasn't even a daylight-balanced option until the late 1980's, so DP's routinely used tungsten stock with the 85B filter for day scenes and kept on doing it even after the first daylight stock was released.

The other advantages are that you can use the stock for a tungsten-lit scene if necessary, or you may be shooting a whole movie on one stock, and thus probably use a tungsten-balanced one. Some DP's don't or didn't like the look of daylight-balanced stocks, although the newest generation pretty well matches the look of the new tungsten stocks. Another advantage is that if you want a cooler look, you could use a less strong correction filter than the 85B, like an 81EF for example.
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#4 Paul Bruening

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 02:06 AM

Another benefit is convenience. One stock. Tungsten balances to daylight with an 85 series filter with only about 2/3 stop loss. Balancing daylight stock to tungsten requires a blue filter that knocks up to 2.5 stops off the lens. That makes the film so much slower that you have to add a small mountain of light to make up the difference.
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#5 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 09:41 AM

Using a daylight balance stock has a slight advantage for lower grain, as you are not "throwing away" 2/3 stop of light by having to use an 85 filter. Daylight stocks do not need the faster blue sensitive layer tungsten balance films require, so the yellow grains tend to be smaller:

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.4.4.4&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.4.4.8&lc=en
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