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How do I can expose a 500asa stock like an 1000 asa stock?


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#1 Alex Fuchs

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 04:14 AM

I have a very simple question: I have to work with 500asa material in an very low light situation. so how can i expose an 500 asa stock like an 100 asa stock?
thx alex
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#2 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 04:40 AM

You can "push" the film by 1 stop at the lab, and then just tell your light meter you are shooting 1000 asa.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 09:47 AM

I have a very simple question: I have to work with 500asa material in an very low light situation. so how can i expose an 500 asa stock like an 100 asa stock?
thx alex


Just expose it as though it were an EI 1000 stock. With a film like Kodak VISION2 500T Color Negative Film 5218, even one stop of underexposure will often produce acceptable results -- you will see a bit less shadow detail, and in a print, the black areas will have less density. Grain will be somewhat more visible. In telecine or DI, a skilled colorist should even be able to minimize the smokiness of the blacks.

If you have the film processed as "push-1", it will print/transfer more like a normally exposed and processed negative, but you should still expect to see a bit less shadow detail due to the underexposure. Push processing will increase the contrast somewhat as well, which can help "hold" the black level better.
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#4 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 02:22 PM

I've seen Kodaks Vison2 5218 take a 2 stop push without much visible grain added. Add an extra stop in "lift" in telecine/DI and you could potentially reach quite deep into the toe of the film. But my suggestion would probably to try to get some really fast and sharp lenses like the new Master Primes from Zeiss to try to avoid pushing too much, if you can.
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#5 Greg Gross

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 05:23 PM

I agree with John from a standpoint of basic photography techniques/exposure etc. . I assume
you have reliable lab(post instructions for them). I'm not trying to be a smart ass here,tell them
exactly how you shot/exposed the film. You really don't need a meter for lowlight, I assume you
are going to open up T2.8,1.8,1.4 etc.. You will know the intensity of your key I presume? Again
I'm not trying to be a smart ass,but you should use a recently calibrated meter if you're using one.
A meter that has been used for professional results and its exposure values know to be true. What
I mean is, not a meter taken out of the box at a photographic flea market and immediately pressed
into service. As I see it you really do not have much of a choice except 500T. Best of luck with your
shoot. I think you will notice a difference with a push beyond two stops.

Greg Gross
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#6 Robert Hughes

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 12:12 PM

And of course you can gain a half stop or more by shooting at a slower speed, ie 16fps vrs 24fps, and have your talent move-really-slow. This options sounds laughable but has been used in real life low light situations. You'll have to post dub for sound, obviously.
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#7 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 12:16 PM

And of course you can gain a half stop or more by shooting at a slower speed, ie 16fps vrs 24fps, and have your talent move-really-slow. This options sounds laughable but has been used in real life low light situations. You'll have to post dub for sound, obviously.


Certainly undercranking can be used to gain more exposure in low light situations if there is no action that will give away the fact it was shot at a slower frame rate.
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