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Cinematography is dead..


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#1 JonathanSheneman

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 10:14 PM

I think just as long as you have nice sharp lenses, pin registration, fresh stock and baths- plus an array of pro lighting equipment such as HMI's and those lights they hang off crains for night shots.. you basically rival all professional cameramen. AND you don't get hassled by the man which happens to me constantely, the police hate movies unless they're pig asses are getting payed $50/hr to provide "security"- what a joke.

So until I can get Cooke and Superspeeds I guess most of you will be better photographers than me.

We've offically entered the Michael Jackson era of seriously freakish cinematography like the Hi-constrasty bleach by-passed look used on most Movies and TV shows. It's unreal and distracting.
I real better now.
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#2 Richard Boddington

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 10:21 PM

What on earth are you babbling on about?

R,
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 10:22 PM

I think just as long as you have nice sharp lenses, pin registration, fresh stock and baths- plus an array of pro lighting equipment such as HMI's and those lights they hang off crains for night shots.. you basically rival all professional cameramen.


Gee, I've got all of that and somehow I don't rival half the pros out there...

It does take a brain to know how to use all of that gear, both technically and artistically.

Personally, it seems that in the last few years we've seen a decline in the use of skip-bleach processing for theatrical features. I think you're complaining about a fad that already reached its peak, although there will always be some exceptions.

Certainly contrasty images are popular -- I'm fond of contrast myself.
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#4 Jonathan Benny

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 10:48 PM

I think just as long as you have nice sharp lenses, pin registration, fresh stock and baths- plus an array of pro lighting equipment such as HMI's and those lights they hang off crains for night shots.. you basically rival all professional cameramen.


As long as you have the state of the art laser technology, a staff of qualified nurses and a sterile operating room, you basically rival all eye surgeons. Make sense to you?

AJB

Edited by Jonathan Benny, 17 January 2006 - 10:49 PM.

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#5 David Silverstein

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 11:01 PM

Wow, thats not true at all.
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#6 Chance Shirley

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 11:08 PM

If you think equipment is what makes a good DP, you don't much about cinematography.

I think I'm doing pretty good sometimes, with my small 16mm kit, then I see some lovely footage somebody shot with a DVX100 and available light. And it blows my stuff away.

A good DP will always manage to get great shots. Even, I bet, with a bad VHS camcorder.
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#7 Mitch Gross

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 11:25 PM

As long as you have a pencil, you can write as well as Shakespeare.

What bullshit.
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#8 Josh Bass

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 11:26 PM

Guys, I think he's mad 'cause he got shut down during a location during a low-budget shoot of some sort. The rest is part of that complaint.

Alright, I reread it. Maybe I'm wrong, but only kinda sorta.

Edited by Josh Bass, 17 January 2006 - 11:28 PM.

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#9 timHealy

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 11:31 PM

for me one of things that show how cinematographers are great is when the display through their work an understanding of the technical and creative elements of the craft and the relationship between the actors, the camera, lighting, and the story being told. And doing all that during a potentially political environment of a film set and industry.

Best

Tim
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#10 Chris Keth

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 12:22 AM

I think just as long as you have nice sharp lenses, pin registration, fresh stock and baths- plus an array of pro lighting equipment such as HMI's and those lights they hang off crains for night shots.. you basically rival all professional cameramen. AND you don't get hassled by the man which happens to me constantely, the police hate movies unless they're pig asses are getting payed $50/hr to provide "security"- what a joke.

So until I can get Cooke and Superspeeds I guess most of you will be better photographers than me.

We've offically entered the Michael Jackson era of seriously freakish cinematography like the Hi-constrasty bleach by-passed look used on most Movies and TV shows. It's unreal and distracting.
I real better now.



Wow, you're a whiny little baby, aren't you? <_<

I bet you anything that if I sat a panaflex and set of lenses in a field with a bunch of HMIs and whatever other equipment you're bitching about, that they won't do a damn thing. Equipment is inanimate, it does nothing except what you make it do. If you make shitty images, it's your fault and nobody else's. :angry:

Stop whining about your equipment and you'll have taken the first step to improving your skills. ;) :rolleyes:

Edited by Christopher D. Keth, 18 January 2006 - 12:23 AM.

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#11 zrszach

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 12:46 AM

I think just as long as you have nice sharp lenses, pin registration, fresh stock and baths- plus an array of pro lighting equipment such as HMI's and those lights they hang off crains for night shots.. you basically rival all professional cameramen. AND you don't get hassled by the man which happens to me constantely, the police hate movies unless they're pig asses are getting payed $50/hr to provide "security"- what a joke.

So until I can get Cooke and Superspeeds I guess most of you will be better photographers than me.

We've offically entered the Michael Jackson era of seriously freakish cinematography like the Hi-constrasty bleach by-passed look used on most Movies and TV shows. It's unreal and distracting.
I real better now.



haha... riiiigggghhhhtttt No matter how much equipment you have nothing can beat good?ol talent. I find it hard to believe that the average Joe would even know how to use all the equipment you listed. If they did, they wouldn?t be paying us to do it?
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#12 David Sweetman

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 02:10 AM

True, all those things aid in getting good images. You must have anticipated this response, but you really have no idea what you're talking about.

Why would you even say that? What does it buy you? If you're a director, I don't know what you get out of bashing cinematographers. Or perhaps you have tried and failed, and therefore must find a way to mend your ego.

You blame your equipment for your awful images. I'm using comparatively awful equipment, and if I get a bad image, I blame only myself -- I'm the one who lit it, who framed it, who operated, and regardless of my lack of grade-a equipment, it's my fault for screwing it up. Because I acknowedge this, I learn from it and don't make the mistake the next time.

You work within the limitations of your equipment. Whatever you are using, it's not imposible to get a decent image with it.

It's ignorant kids like you who give all students a bad name.
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#13 Joshua Reis

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 02:24 AM

I think the key to being a good DP is making the most of what you have. I don't think I have ever been on a show as a DP or an AC where there haven't been uncontrollable limitations. We don't have enough film or enough lights...heck, there never seems to enough time in the day to get all the shots off. However, I think it is the limitation of resources and logistical boundaries that make us as DPs excel and improve our craft. I shot an entire Super 16 short without an AC or loader. I operated, pulled focus during all the shots..I even had to download and load 20 cans of short ends throughout the day. I was extremely stressed, but in telecine, everyhting turned out great. If you can't afford HMIs, use shiny boards. If you can't afford the Arri 435, shoot with an Arri IIC. Again, last week I found myself shooting a spec commercial without a camera crew, but I was better able to focus on DP stuff becuase all the technical camera stuff was transparent to me, I had trained myself and I was able to take care of the camera by instinct. Embrace your limitations becuase in the end, it will only make you a better cinematographer. You will develop a new style that is unique to you becuase you are not workign with the same "tools" as everyone else. I'm a firm beleiver that sometimes "less" can be "more."

Regards,

Joshua R
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#14 Freya Black

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 05:15 AM

Yay!

Cinematography is dead!

Long live Cinematography!

Really looking forward to all the freaky cooke lens movies myself. Sounds wonderful! :)

Where do I sign up?

love

Freya
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#15 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 05:35 AM

It's definitely not the wand but the magic that comes out that counts.
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#16 Jonathan Spear

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 06:33 AM

JonathanSheneman,

Sounds like one of your projects got FUBAR. Try something new! Screw the equipment you've been using so far if it's jinxing you for some reason, and opt for another pallete of filmmaking equipment -- get a different look and take a new approach to your work. If you don't like it, try something else.

I understand where you're coming from.. kinda. No matter how hard you try, you just can't get that Steve Vai sound playing out of a cheap strat and a tube amp. But you know what? The more I practice, the less I care about my equipment because I develop my own style -- and learn MUSIC.

Sounds like what you really need is a great script.

Good luck man. Don't give up.

- Jonathan
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#17 Andy Sparaco SOC

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 07:26 AM

I agree with original poster 100% and urge all of the newie readers of this site to embrace the idea that skill and experience have no value in the current culture of motion picture production. That approach will serve you well in what will prove to be an unfortunately brief career.
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#18 dd3stp233

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 07:49 AM

If you don't want to get caught filming without a permit,
1. Don't let anyone see you filming
2. Leave no traces

I've see good cinematographers film great stuff with 100 year old equipment.
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#19 Greg Gross

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 07:56 AM

Yes but how long did it take for the DVX-100(post production) to get to that point say Vs. super 16?

Greg Gross
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#20 Greg Gross

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 08:21 AM

Sweet Jesus,

Fellows its not about what camera you use. There is art and craft here you know,which comes
with practice and learning(studying)and then putting it to practice. You've got to compete with
how many people to shoot a film? How many features are being shot every year? I'm not trying
to be a smart ass here, but I can take Velvia 100F pop it in an old Nikon FE-2(old by todays st-
andards)shoot at the appropriate time of day(bracket) and do just as good a job as the guy with
a Canon eos1,D,Mark II N. This really pisses some photographers off that are so equipment ori-
ented. I firmly do believe though that the better the lens the better the final product. I do not like
zooms,I prefer primes. You are going to have to shoot with what you can afford or afford to rent
until you make it to the big time. It took me a long time before I could have a canon eos1,D,MarkIIN
in my inventory and I still swear somedays,that I have more fun shooting with a Nikon F2. My dream
machine is the Arri 235,I wish I could afford the film for one.

Greg Gross
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