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#1 Greg Gross

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 05:05 AM

I just picked up two new books about the filmmaking of Francois Traffaut:

1. Francois Traffaut, The Complete Films
2. Francois Trauffaut At Work

Anyway on page 140 of Francois Traffaut,The Complete Films,Francois is standing along
side of a Panavision camera and giving direction to an actress. The camera operator has
a black cloth over his head like you would use when shooting with a view camera. It looks
like a 400'mag on the camera and the camera mag has the word Reflex written on it. The
camera body looks bigger than what I've seen on Panavision cameras. On the side of the
camera body are the words Panavision at the top,and below that Panaspeed. Would anybody
care to comment on what Panavision camera this is? I am fasinated with Panavision cameras.
I've started to do research on them.

Greg Gross
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#2 Max Jacoby

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 10:20 AM

It might be the Panavision R200, which was used before the Gold came out. This camera is much bigger, with a blimp for the magazines if I remember correctely. We used one in filmschool, impossible to do handheld with.
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#3 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 10:28 AM

That's TrUffaut!
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#4 Greg Gross

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 01:11 PM

I think you are right audiris. The more I look at it I believe there's a blimp around the mag.
Its body looks bigger than any I've seen. Thanks for your post and I was hoping you would
see my post. Mr. Salzmann I stand corrected on spelling and thank you. Everytime I spell out
Francois's last name,I want to put an "a" in there for some reason. I know better. I'm reading
both books from cover to cover. Day for Night is my favorite film. Do you know if Fanny Ardant
is still living,still acting? My god he lit her so well and she was so beautiful on film.

Greg Gross
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 01:52 PM

There is some history of Panavision cameras mentioned here:
http://www.in70mm.co...n/diffusion.htm
http://www.cameragui...k_machines5.htm

Some dates:
http://www.panavisio...ryEquipment.htm

Before the PSR was introduced, which in itself was a modification of a Mitchell BNC, I assume Panavision was blimping Mitchells and MOS Arri's and putting their logo on the blimp.
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#6 Greg Gross

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 02:25 PM

Thank You Mr. Mullen,
These are great links and I appreciate your post.

Greg Grossl
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#7 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 02:49 PM

I just picked up two new books about the filmmaking of Francois Traffaut:

1. Francois Traffaut, The Complete Films
2. Francois Trauffaut At Work

Anyway on page 140 of Francois Traffaut,The Complete Films,Francois is standing along
side of a Panavision camera and giving direction to an actress. The camera operator has
a black cloth over his head like you would use when shooting with a view camera. It looks
like a 400'mag on the camera and the camera mag has the word Reflex written on it. The
camera body looks bigger than what I've seen on Panavision cameras. On the side of the
camera body are the words Panavision at the top,and below that Panaspeed. Would anybody
care to comment on what Panavision camera this is? I am fasinated with Panavision cameras.
I've started to do research on them.

Greg Gross


I haven't had a chance to double check this, Panspeed is the Xtal motor for the R200.

---LV
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#8 Robert Lachenay

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 06:56 PM

I know this is quite old and I don't mean to dig up old threads, but if you really want to get the most extensive feel for Truffaut (which enhances another viewing of his work when put into perspective), read TRUFFAUT: A BIOGRAPHY, by Antoine DeBaecque and Serge Toubiana. It's surely the most detailed and inspiring film biography I've ever read.
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#9 Bryan Darling

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 09:06 PM

I know this is quite old and I don't mean to dig up old threads, but if you really want to get the most extensive feel for Truffaut (which enhances another viewing of his work when put into perspective), read TRUFFAUT: A BIOGRAPHY, by Antoine DeBaecque and Serge Toubiana. It's surely the most detailed and inspiring film biography I've ever read.


Ironically, Robert Lachenay was also the name of Truffaut's boyhood best friend.
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#10 Robert Lachenay

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 11:49 PM

"Here. I'll show you a steam engine."

Edited by Robert Lachenay, 14 February 2007 - 11:53 PM.

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Wooden Camera

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Visual Products

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Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam