Jump to content


Photo

flares in 'private ryan'


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 claudio rietti

claudio rietti
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Student
  • New York, NY

Posted 21 January 2006 - 08:48 AM

the infamous opening sequence of 'saving private ryan' has some strange flares coming mostly from the bottom of the screen upwards and they dance as if they were flames. they seem to affect the highlights mostly. Could you tell me if that was done in post or with a filter? Also, the shaky handheld camera...was some of that also done in post? I just can't imagine how those shakes were all so precise in every shot. It's almost as if they attached some sort of vibrator to the lens, but that would most likely throw the focus off. How can one achieve these two effects in camera, if possible?
  • 0

#2 Shawn Murphy

Shawn Murphy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 89 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Seattle

Posted 21 January 2006 - 11:37 AM

I don't personally know the answers, but I believe I found a lot of info on this question by doing a search in this forum for "Saving Private Ryan", look through the many threads that come up, some look to be specifically directed at your questions.

~Shawn
  • 0

#3 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 21 January 2006 - 12:27 PM

the infamous opening sequence of 'saving private ryan' has some strange flares coming mostly from the bottom of the screen upwards and they dance as if they were flames. they seem to affect the highlights mostly. Could you tell me if that was done in post or with a filter? Also, the shaky handheld camera...was some of that also done in post? I just can't imagine how those shakes were all so precise in every shot. It's almost as if they attached some sort of vibrator to the lens, but that would most likely throw the focus off. How can one achieve these two effects in camera, if possible?


Hi,

The flares were created in camera by mis-timing the camera shutter, so that the shutter was partially open whilst the film was advancing.

A search will give you more details.

Stephen
  • 0

#4 John Holland

John Holland
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2248 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London England

Posted 21 January 2006 - 01:18 PM

Plus all the coating was removed from the lens used so flares from anthing hot was made more apparent . john holland .
  • 0

#5 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11937 posts
  • Other

Posted 21 January 2006 - 01:39 PM

Hi,

And yes, they had a mechanical shaker.

Film cameras are reasonably tough, but I can't say I like the idea much!

Phil
  • 0

#6 Nick Mulder

Nick Mulder
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1023 posts
  • Other
  • Auckland, New Zealand

Posted 21 January 2006 - 03:35 PM

.. and if I'm correct the really low shutter angles to make the scene strobe/flicker ?
  • 0

#7 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 21 January 2006 - 04:08 PM

.. and if I'm correct the really low shutter angles to make the scene strobe/flicker ?


Hi,

The 45 degree shutter was for other scenes, giving a very sharp image.

Stephen
  • 0

#8 Matt Butler

Matt Butler
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 93 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney,Australia

Posted 21 January 2006 - 06:22 PM

You can see the effect occasionally on cinema screens where a poorly maintained film projectors' movement
is out of sync between the shutter closed timing and the movement pull-down.
I believe it's called *shutter- ghosting*.

cheers

Edited by matt butler, 21 January 2006 - 06:23 PM.

  • 0

#9 claudio rietti

claudio rietti
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Student
  • New York, NY

Posted 22 January 2006 - 08:20 AM

thanks so much for the responses. this is definitely not the kind of thing i can pull off as i am working with a fixed shutter.

claudio
  • 0

#10 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 22 January 2006 - 11:48 AM

thanks so much for the responses. this is definitely not the kind of thing i can pull off as i am working with a fixed shutter.

claudio


Hi,

Whats the camera? The shutter just has to be mis-timed, on some cameras its not that much of a problem like a Mitchell or Ultracam. With modern Arri cameras its just software.

Stephen
  • 0

#11 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11937 posts
  • Other

Posted 22 January 2006 - 12:16 PM

Hi,

Even easier, it's a very easy effect to simulate in post.

Just vertically motion blur, shift up, then comp back over itself.

Phil
  • 0


CineLab

Visual Products

CineTape

Technodolly

Opal

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Opal

Glidecam

Tai Audio

CineLab

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS