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Is the DVX100b right for me?


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#1 Milo

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 07:59 PM

Hello everyone and anyone. I just joined but have been reading the post for several months. I am a metal artist and need to advertise my work through DVD's and would love some advice on this camera. From all I see the dvx100b is a great camera with lots of options or at least settings. BUT....what about low light? I will be in peoples homes sometimes that I just can't light and I hate noise unless I add it.
I have a budget of about $9,000 for camera, gear, new computer(MAC or PC) and software. You can see my website so I don't have to explain my art.
Thanks,
Milo
milo@milosart.com
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#2 Trevor Swaim

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 08:57 PM

the dvx is a great camera for narrative filmmaking; for what you want I would personally get a Sony PD170. The PD170's have great low light capabilities and look fabulous for direct to DVD stuff. the DVX gets noisy when the lights go down, this isn't really a problem for filmmaking where you can control the light but what you need sounds like a docu-cam type of camera. In my mind the sony PD170 is the king of this type of setting.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 09:20 PM

Personally, if you are using the camera to shoot footage to advertise yourself, you're going to want to do some minimal lighting anyway, so the sensitivity of the camera really isn't an issue. But if this really is for documentary situations where there is no light and you don't need the film look from the progressive-scan capability of the DVX100B, then perhaps another camera would be better. But personally, I'd use some lights if the point is to create a good-looking picture.
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#4 Brian Wells

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 09:45 PM

I will be in peoples homes sometimes that I just can't light

I urge you to consider the Kino Flo Diva 200 and a LitePanels Mini. You can accomplish so much with so little...
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 11:26 PM

I urge you to consider the Kino Flo Diva 200 and a LitePanels Mini. You can accomplish so much with so little...


Even a Chinese Lantern would give you enough exposure for the DVX100B... Kinos, Dedos, Peppers, 1K's, tweenies, there are plenty of lights that can run off of household power. Unless you mean that you can't get permission to add a light from the owners where you are shooting.
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#6 John Schlater II

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 11:30 AM

I too have the same question.

I am planning on purchasing the DVX 100B for the School District I work for and I want to make sure it will work out for what I need it for.

I am usually shooting board meetings in Auditoriums/Cafeterias and special projects. I would like to know if it is suitable for "run and gun" style shooting.

I have used many different DV cameras. I currently use the GL2 and it's NOT that great. It's fine for tripod shooting but for handheld...I hate it. It tends to be nose heavy. I like the Pana because lot of my friends in L.A., New York and Orlando are using it and coming across it in the real world quite a bit. I guess my idea was I wanted to follow suit with what is being used a lot by industry people. I have shot on a PD-150/170/2100 and I think they offer and excellent standard def. video picture. The PD150/170/2100 are great cameras but they too are nose heavy when shooting handheld.

I would consider the XL2 but it is rather pricey and our school district doesn't need a "show boat" like that. I also am not a huge fan of the "wandering" focus problem I have ran across on the GL2, XL1 and the XL1S. I absolutely hate that fuzzy focus issue with those cameras...where they search for the focus in Auto mode. Shooting manual all the time isn't an option because the venues I shoot are always constantly changing. I also don't like that it is awkward to put on yur shoulder and also tends to be nose heavy. All the weight is in the front and not on the back of the camera. This...to me anyway... causes uneveness in handling the camera and puts a lot of weight on the right hand. Still a nice camera but not in our budget.

I am a big fan of the ol' reliable PD100A we have. I think its great for "quick and drity" grab and go stuff. The main thing I don't like about that camera is that it ONLY records in 40 Min. DVCAM mode and is not switchable. Its small and powerful and...shoots in Progressive...which is a feature the newer PD10x version doesn't have.

If you have any advice I am all ears.

JB

Edited by John Schlater II, 02 February 2006 - 11:32 AM.

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#7 Milo

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 04:58 PM

3 months later after buying.....the DVX100b!
Thanks David for pointing me toward the light, literally. I bought a cheap light set (Interfit by Patterson) and with just the 2 I see what you meant by advertising myself with a well lit scene.
Some of my metal art works are too large to light at once but the DVX is great at capturing these.
I have been learning like a mad man and I am the point where it's time to decide if I want 24p and 60i?
My issue so far is software. Burning many practice DVDs and testing on different players and computers.
thanks guys for the early advice on my camera choice
Milo
www.milosart.com
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