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Common 35mm film stocks and fast lenses


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 10:40 PM

I am new to film and was wondering if anyone could give me a short list the most common of 35mm film stocks and what situations they would be used in and also is fast film used only with fast lenses? What is the difference between fast and regular or slow lenses? Sorry if these questions sound elementery but I'm a rookie at this. Thanks-The Captain
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 10:54 PM

I am new to film and was wondering if anyone could give me a short list the most common of 35mm film stocks and what situations they would be used in and also is fast film used only with fast lenses? What is the difference between fast and regular or slow lenses? Sorry if these questions sound elementery but I'm a rookie at this. Thanks-The Captain


The Kodak website is a good place to start:

http://www.kodak.com...0.1.4.9.6&lc=en

Here are the Kodak motion picture camera films:

http://www.kodak.com...d=0.1.4.4&lc=en

And some "tools" to help decide which ones to use:

http://www.kodak.com...d=0.1.4.3&lc=en
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 11:17 PM

Fast lenses open up to a wide aperture to allow more light thru the lens, but as a result, you also get a shallow focus look in 35mm. But they do help when filming in low light levels. The same for fast film, which is more sensitive to light than slower film; the disadvantage is just that faster film is grainier than slower film, but these days, it's not a significant problem in 35mm. So for a night exterior scene, one would probably be using both fast film and fast lenses. But indoors, one might be using fast film but need to use a slower lens, like a zoom lens, and add enough light to make this possible.

I'm sure that Kodak Vision-2 500T 5218 (500 ASA, tungsten-balanced) is by far the most popular film. One could shoot an entire film with it, using correction filters and ND if necessary for daylight scenes, or one could use a slower-speed stock, or even a slower-speed daylight-balanced stock if you didn't want to use correction filters, like Vision-2 250D 5205 (250 ASA, daylight-balanced.)

It can get pretty bright in full sunlight and some people don't like looking through the heavy ND filters necessary if shooting a faster stock outside, so some people will use slow-speed stocks (which also are finer-grained.)
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