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7205 250D indoors?


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#1 dkingfilms

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 04:53 AM

I'm looking for an overly saturated look (ex. Amelie, The Cook The Thief His Wife & Her Lover) and I'm thinking about shooting Vision 2 250D indoors for day and night scenes. I will be using a lot of colored gels on lights (mostly reds, greens, and blue) and I would like to know if the look will be too saturated and make the skin tones look orange. I read in another post that the reds bleed but it didn't say what the skin tones looked like.

I'm also wondering if anyone has used this stock indoors under flourescent lights.

Unfortunately, because I'm on an extremely tight student budget, I cannot test this stock under these lighting conditions. Please help! Thank you.
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#2 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 06:07 AM

I recently used it indoors with a mixed light (Daylight fluo + HMI) and didn't notice anything special about the skins. The colours came out well, quite saturated but not too much. I liked the result.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 07:00 AM

When used with a daylight or HMI source, both 7205 and 7201 should have natural color reproduction that is very similar to the VISION2 tungsten balance films like 7212, 7217, 7218 used with 3200K tungsten lighting. The effect of colored gels on the lights will be similar.
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#4 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 08:07 AM

I actually matched 5205 with 5218 and they look pretty similar, I second that. Th shots we did with 5218 had to be done with it, but the shots done with 5205 could have just as well be done with 5218, no one could tell they were done with 05 or if it were 5218.
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#5 Sam Wells

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 10:33 AM

With this daylight stock indoors under tungsten lights, you'd want to go cooler on all the gels - in effect you've got a "CTO" gel on everything to begin with, if you follow me.

I suppose you could use a #85 filter as a viewing glass when you gel those lights...

Unless you really want the excessive warm look of daylight film in tungsten lighting this would be easier with tungsten stock, no ? True you can bring everything cooler in telecine these days, but when you do that you're sort of bringing the whole package of color in the same direction...

(I sometimes like tungsten fill / kicks in daylight with daylight stock, but in that case the daylight is the dominant color (temperature)

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#6 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 11:45 AM

Since we were inside, for a day scene, I liked the idea of working with daylight sources. HMI are more powerfull than Tungsten lamps, considering it was a "normal" house.(had a 1200 lux arc for the key + kinoflo for fill and that was okay for a F-stop of 4. (not a big room).

With 5218, I would have put a 85 on the camera, taking me down to 320 what was only 1/3 stop more than 5205 anyway, so I thought it would be interesting to do this, just as well, for a try. And that came out pretty well.
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#7 Mitch Gross

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 12:47 PM

I shot most of a feature this way, on 5246, which was the predecesor to '05. When shooting tungsten uncorrected you are really saturating the red layer of the stock. So when you correct the video or film print back the skin tones will still be a bit extra-saturated. Very red or orange objects can bleed in color (although this is much improved in '05) and if you overexpose or underexpose too much you'll run out of any room to correct, so you'll want to be fairly dead on or just a little overexposed. For video finish the difference can be almost completely compensated for ( unlike the much more common tungsten stock in daylight conditions), but with a film print you will generally make skin tones a little extra rich, which makes it appear that your actors have a healthy tan going. That worked well for the comedy I was shooting, but if it is not appropriate for your shoot you should alert the makeup people and perhaps gel the lights that makeup uses with some 1/2 CTO so they can get a sense of the effect.
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#8 dkingfilms

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Posted 19 March 2006 - 01:55 AM

First of all, thank you to those to replied and answered my question.

As a follow up to this question, I shot the majority of the short with 7205 250D under tungsten lights in order to create an overly saturated look. The skin tones held up fine and didn't look orange at all. And yes, the color red did bleed but it was expected.
In one scene, I used 10K with the 250D to make it look like morning and I barely used any color correction. But everything looked the way I wanted to look and I'm happy that I went with this stock in order to acheive the color scheme I envisioned.

Anyhoo, jolly good!

Edited by dkingfilms, 19 March 2006 - 01:56 AM.

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