Jump to content


Photo

S16 Project


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 jijhh

jijhh
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 108 posts
  • Student

Posted 25 January 2006 - 08:18 PM

I'm a director/co-producer in preproduction for a 20 minute short film which we plan to shoot on Super 16. I'm helping out with a lot of tasks like finding rental houses to get our rig from etc. (its a pretty low budget student venture) Anyways, everyone has been talking up S16 like its the new black and I saw for myself that it does look great, but the problem is I'm going into this project with very little knowledge of S16 equipment. For instance, could someone let me know what rentable cameras there are that (without any mechanical work) are S16 compatible? (we plan on using an Arri SR model) Do I just shoot any old regular single-perf 16mm negative stock? What sort of adaptations do I need to make on the camera (framing on the groundglass, etc.) to have it set up properly? I realize that my DP could probably answer some of these questions quite easily but we don't have one signed on yet and I'm trying to get things rolling here. Plus I think its something I should know for the future anyway.

Thanks,

Andrew
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19769 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 25 January 2006 - 08:22 PM

Modern cameras like an Aaton or Arri-SR3 tend to already be set-up for Super-16, but that's something to double-check when renting the camera. Yes, Super-16 uses any single-perf 16mm stock (in fact, most regular 16mm cameras can also run single-perf 16mm stock.)

As for groundglass, a Super-16 camera should have a Super-16 groundglass -- the only issue is whether you need additional framelines other than Full Aperture, which is about 1.68 : 1. You may want 16x9 (1.78 : 1) framelines or 1.85 theatrical framelines, but the truth is that in a pinch, you can shoot with a 1.68 Full Aperture frameline and just frame consistently with a little more excess headroom and be fine with the cropping to 1.78 or 1.85.
  • 0

#3 Joshua Reis

Joshua Reis
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 108 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 25 January 2006 - 09:04 PM

Hi, If you don't have the funds to rent a newer Arri S3, most camera rental houses carry Super 16 converted SR 1 and SR 2 cameras with CE crystal speed, video, and PL mounts. Also, be sure that all the SR 1 and SR 2 magazines have been modified as well so they do not scratch the negative within the extended exposed area. Also, most camera houses should be able to provide you with a specif groundglass whether it be 1.33, 1.66, 1.78 for HDTV or, 1.85. Most if not all older 16mm zooms will not cover Super 16. For example, the polular Zeiss 10-100 must be modified to a 12-120mm to cover Super 16. Best of luck.
  • 0

#4 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19769 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 25 January 2006 - 10:31 PM

The rental house should be able to tell you which 16mm lenses cover the S16 frame. There are a few wide-angle ones you have to be careful about, plus some zooms.
  • 0

#5 Joseph White

Joseph White
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 25 January 2006 - 10:50 PM

a zoom i like quite a bit for super 16mm work is the Canon 8-64mm - it's compact, wide, and really really sharp. but yeah your rental house will let you know what lenses are compatible. century optics have been developing some interesting looking 16mm glass, and the zeiss 16mm ultra primes are absolutely stunningly sharp from what i've seen.

in general i like to stay on the side of the longer lenses when shooting 16mm to achieve shallower depth of field to combat 16mm's increased depth compared to 35mm, but the Canon 8-64 is a nice versatile lens.
  • 0

#6 Brad Grimmett

Brad Grimmett
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2660 posts
  • Steadicam Operator
  • Los Angeles

Posted 26 January 2006 - 03:13 AM

Speaking of the 8-64mm.....is it considered about the same as the 11.5-137mm as far as the glass is concerned? Just curious whether one or the other was considered a better lens than the other. Sorry to hijack the thread.
  • 0

#7 Mitch Gross

Mitch Gross
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2873 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 26 January 2006 - 12:43 PM

All of your questions are easily answered by a decent rental house, and I think that the Abel Cine Tech website has a brief tutorial on Super-16 info. Also, you may find a DP with his own Super-16 camera package (such as myself), who knows all the information you could ever need on the subject and more.

The 8-64 and its successor the 7-63 are sharper than the 11.5-138 and its successor the 11.5-165. Less zoom range means less stress on the optics to achieve a great image. The longer zooms are very good, just not quite as good. They also breath more.
  • 0


Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

CineTape

Technodolly

Opal

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Opal

Visual Products

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

CineLab

Ritter Battery