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Book Reccomendation for 16


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#1 Matt Sander

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 11:52 PM

Hey,

I'm not a first time filmmaker, but I am looking to expand my repertoire as a cinematographer. I have recently been hired as the DP on a 22 minute short being shot on super16 (with the Arri SR3), and I am looking to get a book that will help me learn more about lighting and planning for a variety of scenes and styles of narrative. I would like it to be specific to film and not video, if possible.

Any suggestions? Books you've learned a lot from? I'm not new to filmmaking, so I do have a good knowledge base, so maybe a book that skips the more basic elements of the craft?

Any suggestions would be highly appreciated, thanks a lot!

Edited by Matt Sander, 25 January 2006 - 11:54 PM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 02:30 AM

Well, the book "Cinematography" (Third Edition) by Kris Malkiewicz & myself is mainly written for students shooting 16mm, so it may be a good place to start.

But in terms of lighting, there's Malkiewicz' "Film Lighting", Ross Lowell's "Matters of Light & Depth", but honestly, I learned more by studying movies and paintings and copying the lighting that I liked from those. And studying natural light.
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#3 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 02:05 PM

Well, the book "Cinematography" (Third Edition) by Kris Malkiewicz & myself is mainly written for students shooting 16mm, so it may be a good place to start.

But in terms of lighting, there's Malkiewicz' "Film Lighting", Ross Lowell's "Matters of Light & Depth", but honestly, I learned more by studying movies and paintings and copying the lighting that I liked from those. And studying natural light.


+1

also, bring on a gaffer, so you don't have to worry about doing the lighting, and you can focus more on your shots.
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#4 Matt Sander

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 04:16 PM

+1

also, bring on a gaffer, so you don't have to worry about doing the lighting, and you can focus more on your shots.


Yeah, I have a good gaffer on this shoot and he has been very helpful. Stock tests come back tomorrow so.. fingers crossed.
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Technodolly

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

The Slider

FJS International, LLC