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Looking for Good Gloves


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#1 John Hall

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 05:52 PM

I've been through more gloves than I care to count, and I've yet to find a pair that are a decent balance between durability, dexterity, comfort and heat protection.

My favourite were a pair of those lightweight construction gloves from Home Depot.
Great dexterity, you could wrap and cable or untie knots easily with them.
Not very good heat protection (trying to adjust anything bigger than a 2k had to be down 'carefully').
Plus the best boy on a show I worked on told me thet the gloves contain plastic on the back of the hand, which can melt onto the skin under bigger lights. Yikes!
And they lasted about 3 months before completely falling apart.

Anyway, I just wanted to get peoples' opinions on what gloves they prefer and why. I don't even mind paying a decent price, provided they do what I want for more than 3 months
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#2 Tomas Koolhaas

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 06:22 PM

I've been through more gloves than I care to count, and I've yet to find a pair that are a decent balance between durability, dexterity, comfort and heat protection.

My favourite were a pair of those lightweight construction gloves from Home Depot.
Great dexterity, you could wrap and cable or untie knots easily with them.
Not very good heat protection (trying to adjust anything bigger than a 2k had to be down 'carefully').
Plus the best boy on a show I worked on told me thet the gloves contain plastic on the back of the hand, which can melt onto the skin under bigger lights. Yikes!
And they lasted about 3 months before completely falling apart.

Anyway, I just wanted to get peoples' opinions on what gloves they prefer and why. I don't even mind paying a decent price, provided they do what I want for more than 3 months


Hi,
I tried many gloves too, but I have found that Setwear 'HotHands' (maybe spelled Hothandz) are the best, they are comfortable and more heat resistant than any glove I have ever used. They are pretty much industry standard in Hollywood.
Cheers.
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#3 Don Bachmeier

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 06:47 PM

I went through three pairs of the regular Setwear gloves in short order. Wore them right through. Excellent dexterity picking up the coffe cup though. Started using the Setwear Pro model with great success. My meaty paws split a few seams before I got into the lager size but they have lasted through some awful hard use. Splinters, wet muddy cables, and jagged metal handling in all the four seasons of North Dakota. I have a pair of the Hot Hands in my portable kits but they have mostly been for use by other people using my lights. In everyday use the Pro model has worked fine for up to a 5K, though I wouldn't leave my hand in front of the lens for any length of time (no matter what gloves I was wearing). For adjusting the barndoors, placing scrims and general gripping they are my choice. When I do steam engineering I have a set of good old White Mule gloves (with the canvas backs). They seem to be twice as thick as the usual work gloves and are meant for handling nothing finer than a wrench but they are great for actually laying hands on a large hot fresnel. Iti is still best to consider letting the light cool a bit and/or handling instruments that large with help.
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#4 John Hall

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 09:15 PM

Yeah, I've seen the Hot Hands around some of the shops here; However, they don't seem to be too popular among Toronto technicians.
I'm not really into leather (for personal reasons) but I'm concerned that some of those fake leather gloves might not take the heat / wear. Not to mention that at about $50 I'd want to be fairly certain they don't fall apart in a couple months or so.
Might have to give them a try though.
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#5 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 09:26 PM

Dude, Just my two cents, but I buy the cheap tan gloves from any standard hardward store, I actually got 2 for $3.

This way, when i loose them, I don't care, and plus, I cut a small hole near the part that cover your wrists, and I use that to attach them to a carrabiner.

I'm not particularly big on spending money on poop I can be cheap with. They work great, even though I take them off to tie knots.
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#6 Chien Huey

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 11:22 PM

I used to wear the good ol' yellow leather work gloves but got sick of almost getting burned on anything bigger than a 1K. Bought a pair of Hothands - best $50 I've ever spent.

Keep any leather gloves away from water. Moisture destroys leather so whenever it's snowing/raining out I put away my Hothands and use my cheapie gloves.

John, the Hothands gloves sell for $50CAD in Toronto? Hmmm... maybe I'll buy a spare pair next time I'm in Canuckland. :lol:
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#7 John Hall

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 12:00 AM

Sorry Chien, I quoted the USD price (If I said I was getting them for $65 than it would appear I was being ripped off =).

I think I may invest in a pair of Hot Hands, but also keep a beater pair of gloves around for carrying pipe and stands and such,

Thanks all for your advice.
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#8 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 03:07 AM

I have the solution OVEN MITS!!!(':D', 'smid_4')
:D

Edited by Capt.Video, 30 January 2006 - 03:10 AM.

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#9 Jayson Crothers

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 05:28 AM

They're not that great for the heat (ie, not a good idea for any electricians), but for gripping or operating I've found a pair of Mechanix gloves are fantastic. Nascar pit crews allegedly use them and I've received two pairs for free from the company just by asking nicely. My key grip from Chicago swears by them and I've used the same pair for over 3 years for all of my handheld operating - very sturdy and I can still tie a knot easily with them on - I can even dial my cell phone with them on!

You can check out their website at www.mechanix.com.
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#10 Matt Irwin

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 02:51 PM

I've used the Mechanix gloves and I agree, they're awesome-- for gripping. They can't be beat for tactile control. However anytime hot lights come into the picture, the Setwear Hot Hands are the best. Out of curiosity, I placed my gloved hand on the metal heat sink of a 2k just after turning it off and didn't feel uncomfortable heat for about 30 seconds (more than enough time to adjust a barndoor or change a scrim). For those in LA, Modern Studio Equipment sells the Hot Hands for about $40 instead of $50.
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#11 Andrew Redd

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 09:43 PM

I still go with my mechanix gloves for the grip jobs and my $20 leathers (the ones with the donkey head on the them, not sure the brand name off the top of my head) from Home Depot for electric work. Never had a problem with either. Also I've gotten them wet many times and never had a problem with them prematurely falling apart because they got wet.
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#12 Rik Andino

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 03:08 AM

Sorry Chien, I quoted the USD price (If I said I was getting them for $65 than it would appear I was being ripped off =).

I think I may invest in a pair of Hot Hands, but also keep a beater pair of gloves around for carrying pipe and stands and such,

Thanks all for your advice.


This I think is the best solution...
if you'd do G or E as a regular thing
Then you should have several pairs of gloves on hand for different jobs.

Set-wears Hot Handz are the best for handling hot lights...

Then I'd get a few cheap work gloves for hard-core grip work

And maybe climbers glove or another good sport glove for coiling or tying knots.

Anyways it's just like a rachet sometimes it's good to have more than one.


Good Luck
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