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SHUTTER SPEED


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#1 freddie bonfanti

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:50 PM

what difference does it make when shooting in video at different shutter speeds? i know that if the shutter is low the image strobes a lot but what about when you shoot at high shutter speed like 1000?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 07:54 PM

what difference does it make when shooting in video at different shutter speeds? i know that if the shutter is low the image strobes a lot but what about when you shoot at high shutter speed like 1000?


Motion strobes MORE when the shutter speed is too short, like at 24 fps / 1/100th. It BLURS more when the shutter speed is too long.

Strobing is also related to frame rate. 24 fps is a rather low sampling rate, so motion tends to strobe. Shorter than normal shutter speed makes this worse because a certain amount of blur per frame is necessary to make the motion look more continuous. Strobing is better with 60i photography because of the higher sampling rate, but will get worse again with very short shutter speeds / fast action.
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#3 umstudent

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 07:15 PM

Motion strobes MORE when the shutter speed is too short, like at 24 fps / 1/100th. It BLURS more when the shutter speed is too long.

Strobing is also related to frame rate. 24 fps is a rather low sampling rate, so motion tends to strobe. Shorter than normal shutter speed makes this worse because a certain amount of blur per frame is necessary to make the motion look more continuous. Strobing is better with 60i photography because of the higher sampling rate, but will get worse again with very short shutter speeds / fast action.


Will putting the shutter at a 45 degree angle and shooting in slow motion increase the shutter speed of the image so that one can then take the footage to post and speed the film up to "regular" speed and then recieve an image that has an exceptionally high shutter...or does the process of speeding the film in the camera up make it more difficult to still achieve the stacato effect.

I've run tests with an Arri SR3: 45 degree at 120 fps...the results are look warm...WHY?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 08:49 PM

Will putting the shutter at a 45 degree angle and shooting in slow motion increase the shutter speed of the image so that one can then take the footage to post and speed the film up to "regular" speed and then recieve an image that has an exceptionally high shutter...or does the process of speeding the film in the camera up make it more difficult to still achieve the stacato effect.

I've run tests with an Arri SR3: 45 degree at 120 fps...the results are look warm...WHY?


You'd get a staccato effect just shooting at 24 fps with a 45 degree shutter, so why shoot at 120 fps if you're just going to convert it to 24 fps in post? It would be easier to just rent a camera that can go down to an 11 degree shutter angle if you want even more strobing, and shoot at 24 fps.
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#5 Stephen Williams

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 10:28 AM

You'd get a staccato effect just shooting at 24 fps with a 45 degree shutter, so why shoot at 120 fps if you're just going to convert it to 24 fps in post? It would be easier to just rent a camera that can go down to an 11 degree shutter angle if you want even more strobing, and shoot at 24 fps.


Hi,

If your going to really small angles below 45 degrees always test the camera first. I have had slight exposure flickering at 22.5 degrees.

Stephen
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