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#1 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 02:00 AM

I get 16mm film to do anything to; hand process, scratch, spit on; anything.

I'm looking for suggestions.

It's pretty much a class where they don't want you to use the film in a conventional way.

Anyone have any cool idea's?

I know this kid put moth wings on the frames, and when it was passed through the projector (get over it, it worked), it looked real cool.
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#2 Ahjudah

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 02:20 AM

Anyone have any cool idea's?

I know this kid put moth wings on the frames, and when it was passed through the projector (get over it, it worked), it looked real cool.



Was that kid named Stan Brakhage?




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#3 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 02:36 PM

Anyone have any cool idea's?

I know this kid put moth wings on the frames, and when it was passed through the projector (get over it, it worked), it looked real cool.
Was that kid named Stan Brakhage?
Jon Barr
Film Student
Philadelphia, PA



No clue.
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#4 Jaan Shenberger

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 03:24 PM

No clue.



i hope your instructor at least called the kid out on it, because it is a blatant rip from stan brakhage.
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#5 Steven Budden

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 01:50 PM

Actually, you should watch some Stan Brakhage films on DVD to get some ideas.

I'd say just start shooting what interests you while learning about the camera and processing. Also, stop motion animation can be very interesting and unconventional (and timelapse). Of course, everything also has potential to be predictable and boring, so watch out! You can also try cutting in some found footage.

Steven
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#6 Bill Totolo

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 02:14 PM

I would also recomend reading some Carl Jung (Man and his Symbols). Much of Fellini's 8 1/2 may be considered experimental and he had Carl on set as an advisor.

I think this should be recomended reading for filmmakers.
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#7 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 04:04 PM

I would also recomend reading some Carl Jung (Man and his Symbols). Much of Fellini's 8 1/2 may be considered experimental and he had Carl on set as an advisor.


---Since Jung died in 1961, nearly 86 years old and 8 1/2 was made in 1962 or '63 for a mid '63 release.
I'm dubious.

Yet still:
---LV
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#8 Dominik Muench

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 04:32 PM

Anyone have any cool idea's?

I know this kid put moth wings on the frames, and when it was passed through the projector (get over it, it worked), it looked real cool.
Was that kid named Stan Brakhage?
Jon Barr
Film Student
Philadelphia, PA



yes it was :) and mothlight was extremely cool.
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#9 Sam Wells

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 07:52 PM

Actually the moth wings (secured to leader by sprocketed mylar tape) passed through an optical printer (and just barely !) not a projector...

He did another one with various plant material but in 35mm "The Garden Of Earthly Delights" (it's on the Criterion DVD)

-Sam
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#10 Robert Hughes

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 04:22 PM

Hand processing opens a whole world of possibilities. Not only can you do regular processing, you can intentionally degrade your film through various processing irregularities; overheating the developer (causes emulsion loss and solarization), "bucket" processing (causes scratches, nicks and random emulsion loss), multiple stop push processing (increases grain and contrast), under-fixing (causes irregular shadowing and density), the list goes on. I've taken some of my early, improperly processed films to my telecine vendor, and he joked, "Do you know how much you'd have to pay to get this effect intentionally?"

You can hand process b&w negative film with nothing more than a plastic bucket, a darkroom and a couple photo chemicals. It's fun, educational, and your classmates will be impressed by your "core" gamesmanship.

Even easier, you can try in-camera effects; place various items between your camera lens and the image; half mirrors, crystal goblets, old window glass, reflective metal items. For my first film school Super 8 I used a half-silvered mirror and shot imitation double exposure scenes of the local oil refinery. Pipes going every which way!

Edited by Robert Hughes, 08 February 2006 - 04:28 PM.

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#11 Steven Budden

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Posted 12 February 2006 - 12:51 PM

Hand processing is great and relatively simple with negative.

Also try and find a copy of Helen Hill's Recipes for Disaster, which is a booklet containing many experimental filmmakers' observations and techniques.

I know most of the stock was destroyed in the New Orleans flood but a camera shop in Berkeley here had a few so you never know.

Steven
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#12 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 12 February 2006 - 01:17 PM

I went to a film festival last year where someone took 16mm film stock, and covered it with garbage (mostly food) for a few days.. washed it off and projected it. It was a really cool effect of dancing blotchy visuals set to music... but got kind of old after a few minutes. maybe should have used a 100ft spool instead of a 10 minute 400ft spool :blink:
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#13 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 08:38 AM

where is this course held?

thanks

Rolfe
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#14 jasarsenault

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 06:12 PM

I have a copy of recipes for disaster around here, somewhere, and it is quite good.
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#15 sinisa.kukic

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 08:52 PM

recipies for disaster is a great books.

try doing some rayograms.

in the dark on a flat table lay out a some unexposed films. put translucent objects on it. (like found footage, newspaper wetted down with baby oil, old blueprints. thin leaves , the possibilities are endless.) when you have your objects placed flash the table with a flashlight. do it quickly though. then can the film and hand process it or give it to a lab for processing.

good luck and have fun
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#16 jasarsenault

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Posted 08 January 2007 - 05:04 PM

Hey everybody...not bringing back this thread because of what it was about but what was in it. There was discussion of Helen Hill and her book Recipe for disaster...I came acoss some disturbing news and a loss for the film making community. www.helenhill.org
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#17 Martin Yernazian

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Posted 08 January 2007 - 10:10 PM

Yeah I just heard this is really mess it up!!!
check the link to the article
http://www.thestate....al/16386330.htm
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#18 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 09 January 2007 - 04:07 PM

Take a look at Maya Deren's stuff as well....
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#19 Easton Sheahan-Lee

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Posted 09 January 2007 - 04:57 PM

Just a suggestion there is a guy whom I have had the pleasure of meeting and for an experimental project he used a flag with black and white then pasted pictures of various things onto it, then ran this fan over the flag and intercut various shots of the pictures flapping and fading.....then did some negative scratchwork.

I thought it was sorta neat.....I'll see if I can dig it up?
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#20 Scott Cohen

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Posted 09 January 2007 - 05:51 PM

i hope your instructor at least called the kid out on it, because it is a blatant rip from stan brakhage.


I hope so too... Totally rip from a dead guy who was THE pioneer of experimental.

Get NETFLIX and have them deliver to your door the Brakhage series.

Watch DOG STAR MAN... and all his other films too.

Matt Stone and Trey Parker studied under Brakhage. Kubrick admired Brakhage. It is rumored he approached him to do the 2001 dream sequence.

How the heck did your fellow student run it through the projector. It would have caught on the gate and most likely cause some serious projector distress.

When Brakhage did Mothlight. He taped the wings to clear film and then ran a print from it. He never ran the original through for projection...

SC
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The Slider

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rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

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Tai Audio