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pro8mm 200T film


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#1 Ryoma Kohari

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 06:14 AM

I'm going to shoot a music video with pro8mm 200T, which is color negative film.
This film has ISO200 for tungsten balance, and ISO 125 for day light balance with 85 filter.
I will shoot in exterior without 85 filter, because I wanna bluish image.

Then, I have a simple question.
When I shoot in exterior without 85 filter, should I read a light meter with ISO 200 or 125??
I'm just confusing about it.

Could you give me a help??

Thanks.
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#2 zrszach

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 12:41 PM

I'm going to shoot a music video with pro8mm 200T, which is color negative film.
This film has ISO200 for tungsten balance, and ISO 125 for day light balance with 85 filter.
I will shoot in exterior without 85 filter, because I wanna bluish image.

Then, I have a simple question.
When I shoot in exterior without 85 filter, should I read a light meter with ISO 200 or 125??
I'm just confusing about it.

Could you give me a help??

Thanks.


set at 200... the ISO Compensation is for the filter.

Edited by zrszach, 27 January 2006 - 12:42 PM.

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#3 timHealy

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 01:35 PM

You could rate the 200 for 125 and overexpose a bit. It is negative after all and it usually likes a little overexposure. I personally overexpose most negative 2/3's of a stop depending on the situation.

The creative choice is yours to make. A test before is always the best way to be sure.

Good luck.

Best

Tim
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#4 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 04:20 PM

Look into doing a bleach bypass process if your shooting outside with no filter, can be a cool effect, no pun intended.
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#5 Chris Burke

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 12:39 AM

If you are shooting the 7217, then may I suggest that you buy direct from Kodak. The filmstock and carts are better than those you will get from Pro8mm. They use lots of short ends for their film. In terms of how to rate the film and the color cast, test. Many say rate the stock at least 2/3 over. some say rate it at 100 asa. I would shoot a test roll and see what works best for you. Good luck
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#6 Mike Crane

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 05:22 PM

If you are shooting the 7217, then may I suggest that you buy direct from Kodak. The filmstock and carts are better than those you will get from Pro8mm. They use lots of short ends for their film. In terms of how to rate the film and the color cast, test. Many say rate the stock at least 2/3 over. some say rate it at 100 asa. I would shoot a test roll and see what works best for you. Good luck


I agree with zaefod. Going with Kodak brand film will be less expensive and better quality. This will also allow you to choose a better quality lab and telecine facility to go with.
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#7 Will Montgomery

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 09:28 PM

I agree with zaefod. Going with Kodak brand film will be less expensive and better quality. This will also allow you to choose a better quality lab and telecine facility to go with.

I agree with Zaefod and Mike Crane.

If you are shooting Vision 2 200T or Vision2 500T, buy direct from Kodak, you can rely on their quality control. I have no idea why Pro8mm even sells their own version.
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#8 Samuel Berger

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 01:09 AM

Maybe he already has the filmstock and needs to use it up. I hate Pro8mm as a company, but they do reload cartridges with any sort of Kodak film you request...at an exorbitant price.
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#9 Justin Lovell

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 09:16 PM

the bleach bypass would simply desaturate the image and increase the contrast, lessening the harsness of the blue tinge, non?

has anyone simulated this effect by just desaturating the image in post and compared the results with that of a chemical desaturation (bleach bypass)?
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#10 Michael Ryan

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 11:14 AM

Maybe he already has the filmstock and needs to use it up. I hate Pro8mm as a company, but they do reload cartridges with any sort of Kodak film you request...at an exorbitant price.

Hello All,

I have to take exception to something that Arisian has said. You said in your post that, "I hate Pro8mm as a company."

First off, I think "hate" is a fairly strong word. I think it's valid that you dislike their service (or whatever the reason is) because that's your opinion. I'm fine with that.

But I think it's unfair on a forum to "label" a company a certain way without any facts, especially since Pro8mm is such a very important company in the Super 8 world. They are a small company that contribute a great deal to the health and wellness of Super 8 filmmaking. Outside of Kodak, do you know of any other company that is willing to take 35mm professional film stock and cut it down and package it into Super 8 for us? It's amazing that they can do that at the price they sell it for.

A lot of people have said their pricing is very high. Very high compared to what? Compared to Wal-Mart? Yes, I would agree that if you are comparing their prices to Wal-Mart, then they are very expensive. But you have to look at the "big picture". They are a very small company serving a very small market. Without that price point on their products, quess what...they wouldn't be around.

That fact is, they have helped lots of filmmakers in many different ways. They did a lot for Ryan Thomas and his film THE BRUCE MOVIE. So much so that he gives them a credit in his motion picture.

All companies large and small make mistakes. I wouldn't judge any company on one service failure. If they always let you down, then that's a valid point. One time only is not a pattern.

To sum up, all I'm saying is it's easy (and the trend these days) to rant and bash over anything. You have to pick your words carefully.

Because the fact is, Pro8mm is an important company in the Super 8 world and they provide an important service to Super 8 fimmakers.

Mike
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#11 Mike Crane

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 02:00 PM

True Mike,

"Hate" is a very strong word. But, what can you say about a company that the covers up the fact that they have been stuffing their super 8 cartridges with cheap re-can film for years without letting the buyers know about it? I myself had X-ray all over my film when everything I shot was local. Later, a Pro8mm employee (who still works there) privately told me that they use recan and short end film exclusively for their process to make bigger profits.

To top it all off, Pro8mm sells recan super 8 with processing for MORE than you can buy new Kodak film packaged with processing from companies like Spectra Film and Video and Yale!

So, in truth, we do others a favor by recommending places that sell quality products and services as well as steering people away from places that take advantage of people. But, in the end, it is still up to the person who does their own research who they will use.
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#12 Sean McHenry

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 12:56 PM

I have been a video guy for a long, long time but, when "Sky Captain..." came out, everyone wanted to know about bleach bypass, for video effects. Magic Bullet has a preset Bleach Bypass if you go digital after the film process.

In a post situation, in Avid, I have done this, desaturate a copy of the clip and place it on a lower track then increase contrast and even add a bit of softness to the image in an upper track and play with various dissovles between the two tracks. This gives you the base B&W and a desaturated but softer coloration. You can enhance the colored track by shifting the colors, etc. It seems redundant to desaturate one clip and place the colored version right on top of it but it actually works nicely.

I like to throw a touch of gausian blur on things to soften it up a bit.

So that's one idea if you go video. I like to play with things in post when shooting video. I alwasy go for the clean pristine copy from the camera and adjust in post. If I don't like it I can always step backward. Not so if you do in camera effects or via processing.

In film, I'm lucky to get a usable image right now, but I'm learning.

Sean McHenry
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#13 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 03:51 PM

Here are couple of the bigger grumbles about Pro-8mm.

Grumble number 1. Allegedly Pro-8mm used to use new Kodak negative film, but over time they switched to short end recans. All negative stocks react differently the older they get, so short end recans on a reduced film area (aka when the film is slit down to 8mm) is probably about the worst thing one could cut down to super-8 negative. It seems to me that if Pro-8mm only offered new film stock, it would be a no brainer to then offer short ends at a reduced price. But there is no distinction, it's all priced the same.

Grumble number 2. Their Rank Transfers run to the grainy side. A super-8mm rank is the hardest to maintain of all ranks and it would not be surprising if either they do not keep up on the maintenance end, OR even if they do maintain their rank, the professionals love the grainy look because it gives a different edge from the prettier results they will get in 16m and 35mm. The contrast between pretty looking 35mm and gritty grainy looking Super-8 is probably preferred by the professionals. BUT, If you are a newbie trying to make a demo reel and want the Super-8 film to look more polished when it is transferred to video the signature look Pro-8mm is known for is probably not for you.
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