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5299/7299


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#1 Alex Corn

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 04:22 PM

I was just wondering if anyone could fill me in on the differences between this stock and "regular" kodak stocks in more detail than the kodak site offers. Why can't it be printed? What makes it so good for telecine? Does it have the same latitude as the other kodak stuff? Any info would be appreciated.
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 04:36 PM

I was just wondering if anyone could fill me in on the differences between this stock and "regular" kodak stocks in more detail than the kodak site offers. Why can't it be printed? What makes it so good for telecine? Does it have the same latitude as the other kodak stuff? Any info would be appreciated.


Quite a few differences:

Much lower in overall contrast.
More latitude.
Contrast mismatch if printed directly onto print film.
Although orange in color, it does NOT have colored coupler masking.

The proprietary look up tables and color matrixing in the KODAK VISION2 HD Digital Processor are needed to fully utilize the excellent latitude, flexibility, tone scale and color reproduction capabilities of 7299.
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#3 Dickson Sorensen

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 04:56 PM

What exposure index is reccomended?

Do you reccomend an 85 filter for exterior?

Is this film suitable or an advantage for scanning to DI and film out from that?

If the film is printed is there anything interesting or off beat about the way is looks (example: weird balance of colors achieved by cross processing)?
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#4 Alex Corn

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 04:58 PM

What is the effective latitude?
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 06:36 PM

Kodak relies a lot on its latitude when they tell people that it can be rated at 320 or 500 ASA, and it can be shot daylight or tungsten, but I believe it is tungsten balanced. As for the ASA rating, like most negative stocks, it probably looks richer if shot at 320 ASA instead of 500 ASA, just like Expression does.

As for latitude, it all depends on what you think the effective f-stop range of normal color neg stock is, but this stock probably has another stop or two of information compared to normal Vision-2 stocks, so if you think normal stock has 12-stops of information, then this stock is more like 13 to 14 stops. But of course, being so low-con looking, most people are probably going to add some contrast when timing the image anyway. It's definitely a stock designed for scanning / telecine in mind, not printing.
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 07:42 PM

What exposure index is reccomended?

Do you reccomend an 85 filter for exterior?

Is this film suitable or an advantage for scanning to DI and film out from that?

If the film is printed is there anything interesting or off beat about the way is looks (example: weird balance of colors achieved by cross processing)?


If you look at the published technical data, the film requires the least digital correction if it is treated as a tungsten balance film. So using the 85 filter in daylight is preferred, but optional. As David notes, any color negative film gets more shadow detail and finer grain with slight overexposure. The film is optimized for scanning or telecine when using the KODAK VISION2 HD Digital Processor. The film is designed to give "normal" color reproduction, but there is lots of flexibility to manipulate the image in post.
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#7 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 08:47 PM

I've been told that the new vision 2 stocks have a 7 stop latitude.

Am I correct in thinking that if you need to shoot at 5.6, you are safe in any direction?

(my first thinking after hearing 7 stops in latitude is why bother setting the aperture??)

Is it 3.5 stops over under, or 7 over/under, or something totally different?

Thank you for the help.
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 09:02 PM

The confusion comes from the way we throw the word "latitude" around. The film records a range of exposures, at least 12-stops worth. But "latitude" actually means "ability to correct for mis-exposure while still getting acceptable results." Trouble is, we all define "acceptable" individually -- it's a subjective concept.

You can underexpose an image three stops and print it back to normal, but personally, I wouldn't call it acceptable looking. You'd have milky blacks, more grain, a loss of shadow detail. Three stops overexposure and printing down would be a little better-looking, but you'd have muddy whites and bright highlights that look soft, lacking detail. So from my standpoint, I think you only really have one stop under and two stops over to misexpose a shot -- three-stops total "latitude" -- before it's time to consider reshooting. But that's just me.

The other issue is CONSISTENCY. Even if you can correct various shots by printing them up or down, their black levels, grain levels, etc. would change so there would still be matching problems, hence why exposing consistently no matter what general density level you like the best, matters.
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#9 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 09:06 PM

The confusion comes from the way we throw the word "latitude" around. The film records a range of exposures, at least 12-stops worth. But "latitude" actually means "ability to correct for mis-exposure while still getting acceptable results." Trouble is, we all define "acceptable" individually -- it's a subjective concept.

You can underexpose an image three stops and print it back to normal, but personally, I wouldn't call it acceptable looking. You'd have milky blacks, more grain, a loss of shadow detail. Three stops overexposure and printing down would be a little better-looking, but you'd have muddy whites and bright highlights that look soft, lacking detail. So from my standpoint, I think you only really have one stop under and two stops over to misexpose a shot -- three-stops total "latitude" -- before it's time to consider reshooting. But that's just me.

The other issue is CONSISTENCY. Even if you can correct various shots by printing them up or down, their black levels, grain levels, etc. would change so there would still be matching problems, hence why exposing consistently no matter what general density level you like the best, matters.



Thanks for the clarity david. I kind of figured that, and I'm happy you cleared that up.
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#10 adam greeves

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Posted 16 November 2006 - 08:31 PM

Although orange in color, it does NOT have colored coupler masking.



can you explain this. why is it orange if not for contrast?
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