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Don't try this with a VHS tape


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#1 Michael Ryan

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 11:55 PM

Hello All,

Now that I have my Chinon 2500GL up and running and in near mint condition, I pulled out some 8mm
Kodak film that my Dad shot 42 years ago.

All I can say is that 42 year old Kodachrome looked incredible. The reds, blues still looked good to me. The film projected like it had just come back from the lab.

Now, let's see a show of hands, how many of you think my VHS will look as good as the Kodachrome 42 years from now. On second thought, I don't think I'll even be able to find a player to view the VHS with.

Film is timeless. Digital is a corporate plan to keep you buying new equipment every three years.

Mike
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#2 Stephen Phipps

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 12:27 PM

I've got some Beta and U-Matic tapes that are approaching 30 years old and they still rival Kodachrome quality. Depends much on how the media is stored. It is getting very hard finding vintage video equipment that works well, but I love the challenge of getting it going again. I have much better luck finding 8mm equipment in working shape.

Used VHS machines will be all over the place 42 years from now, but those still working well will cost a fortune. I doubt new machines will be available unless they're commercial models.

Now, let's see a show of hands, how many of you think my VHS will look as good as the Kodachrome 42 years from now. On second thought, I don't think I'll even be able to find a player to view the VHS with.


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#3 Michael Ryan

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 08:56 PM

Well, the thing about film equipment is it is mainly (not always) mechanical and so it can be fixed years and years later. A VHS machine is mainly electronic and just won't stand the test of time. We are going to have the same problem with VHS machines that we do with 5 year old computers. There is mountains of them that either don't work or nobody wants and they are filling up our landfills.

42 years from now consumers will be buying their movies and storing their home movies on magnetic bubble or whatever the format is. A good case in point is laserdiscs. I had hundreds of laserdiscs, but my player broke down and there were no new ones, the cost of getting the old one fixed was unreal. So, you may want to keep watching laserdisc, but there just isn't the supply of working machines to keep your collection. I mean, I could be wrong, but 42 years from now there won't be lots of VHS machine around.

Mike
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

The Slider

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Opal