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#1 Craig Knowles

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 01:36 AM

Two questions or observations about Match Point:

1) Was there any particular reason why this film displayed so much flickering during horizontal pans? I know that flickering during a pan can be an issue, but I can't think of a film with more strobing pans than this one. It was most obvious in scenes with a lot of horizontal rhythm of line and tone.

2) There were two instances of the dreaded "dark scene to bright scene" cuts in this film. Although both instances seemed to be motivated by painful on-screen events, does this drive anyone insane besides myself? One cut in particular nearly burned the eyes right out of my head.

Edited by Craig Knowles, 30 January 2006 - 01:37 AM.

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#2 Charles Haine

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 01:32 PM

Pan-flicker is dramatically effected by screen size; you are more likely to notice it at the Cinerama dome (or any other large screen) than the small, back of the multiplex or art theatres where Woody Allen movies typically play.

Not to say that they did that on purpose, just saying that I saw Match Point in theatre 13 or 14 of a multi-plex (traditionally smaller), and didn't notice any pan-flicker. Did you see it on a very large screen?

Thought MATCH POINT was personally the most exciting movie of the year: a return to form for probably the greatest living American film maker who had, unfortunately, seemed to have lost his way for awhile. Also, another example of a new trend I'm noticing where the performances in the film are stronger than the performances in the trailer, which don't appear to be cut to the actors advantage anymore (noticed this with MEMOIRS OF A GEISHA, as well).

Heard a rumor that on both this and THE ISLAND, Scarlette Johanson pushed to do nudity, and the directors resisted out of fear of R ratings. A bit of a reverse the stereotype from STATE & MAIN, with the director pushing for toplessness and the actress being modest.

Strange days we live in.

chuck
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 02:52 PM

I didn't notice anything unusual about the panning in the film.

Cuts from bright to dark scenes or vice-versa don't bother me.
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#4 Tim J Durham

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 03:29 PM

Heard a rumor that on both this and THE ISLAND, Scarlette Johanson pushed to do nudity, and the directors resisted out of fear of R ratings. A bit of a reverse the stereotype from STATE & MAIN, with the director pushing for toplessness and the actress being modest.

Strange days we live in.

chuck


I think if Scarlet had wanted to be nude, they'd have facilitated that.
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#5 Dan Goulder

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 06:37 PM

I think if Scarlet had wanted to be nude, they'd have facilitated that.

onscreen: not necessarily
offscreen: You betcha.
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#6 Ahjudah

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 06:51 PM

offscreen: You betcha.



Frankly, my dear, I DO give a damn.



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#7 Charles Haine

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 04:21 PM

This is all a rumor, of course, but I heard in both cases they were afraid of an R rating.

Since the Island didn't do well anyway, it seems silly, and in Woody Allen's case, I can't imagine that a lot of 15 year olds were clamoring to see the latest movie by a film maker who hasn't really made a great film in their lifetime.

However, studio's hate R's. Or did. After WEDDING CRASHERS, prepare for a lot of R rated comedy.

Back to Match Point, the only thing that bothered me was a 360' pan in the fancy apartment with a medium-obvious aperture rack in the middle. Something didn't feel 100% right about that, for me, maybe it felt too fast, or too much like it was done in post?

Or, more probably, I was waiting for it because I knew, with a location like that (seen in the trailer), it would eventually pop up.

Otherwise, just great to have a new Woody Allen movie, and a beautiful one.

chuck
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#8 Craig Knowles

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 05:52 PM

Cuts from bright to dark scenes or vice-versa don't bother me.


I must have a large aperture iris. Cuts from dark/night scenes to bright white scenes are painful to me.

Edited by Craig Knowles, 03 February 2006 - 05:55 PM.

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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 06:17 PM

I must have a large aperture iris. Cuts from dark/night scenes to bright white scenes are painful to me.


I'm not sure what a DP could even do about that anyway, since scenes and shots are rearranged in editing. You wouldn't want to light all your night scenes brightly so that they felt the same overall intensity as a day scene. And you don't know what type of shot will end the scene -- it may be a well-lit face that leaves the frame, ending on black, before cutting to a bright day scene. And you're not going to make all of your day scenes dark just in case they get cut to night scenes.

If anything, I strongly object to the tendency for conservative filmmakers to time a movie to all one brightness level rather than leave in strong variations.
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#10 Jon Kukla

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 06:33 PM

Don't know about Match Point nudity, but this confirms The Island:

http://actionadventu...ajohanssonI.htm
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#11 Craig Knowles

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 02:54 AM

I'm not sure what a DP could even do about that anyway, since scenes and shots are rearranged in editing.


The placement of the hard black-to-white cuts in ?Match Point? is such that they were almost certainly planned. Both occurred at points of extreme events in the main characters life (both marriages, actually).

In this case, the black-to-white cuts occur as transitions between scenes. I?d expect an editor would fade into the white scene to soften the transition.

I'm not "against" them per se. I suspect most times it happens by accident. At least its use was motivated here.
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#12 Josh Bass

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 10:48 AM

I caught at least two iris pulls during shots. Sneaky bastards.



Hey, I'm sure I'm the only one that caught this, but, during the credits, there was only one grip listed.

I said to my friend "just the one grip?"

He said "Must've been hell unloading the truck."
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