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Fading light, stock choice


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#1 Chris Clarke

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 12:53 PM

Hi all.
I'm going to be lighting a music video in the next month or so and I have some questions regarding the stock and colour correction that I'm going to use.
The video is set in an English seaside fairground. It's going to be shot mostly from a doggicam bodymount on super 16 looking back at the singer. We will start shooting around 11ish in the morning and will continue through daylight, dusk and into night. Lighting wise I am going to key my main artist with a hand held soft source, a little over exposed, just above the camera. This will be daylight balanced. The background will be natural daylight with lots of practical illumination coming from the fairground rides and stalls. Going into night, the background will really come to life with lots of colours...etc.
My worry is regarding the cross-over from day into night. I was planning on shooting on 7218 500T with an 85 for the day stuff. I know that I could just pull it at some point and let the telecine take care of the rest, but I kind of want to do it properly and go to an 85B, then maybe an LLD before shooting clean.
What are your thoughts? Would shooting a new greyscale and macbeth as I change filters be of help in keeping a consistent colour? At what point should I start adding 1/2 or full CTO to my lighting source?
As much as I want to keep it correctly filtered, the difference in colour temperature as the sun goes down will really help with the feel of the video which will probably be cut with different times of day mixed up. I should also add that we are going to be shooting at different speeds possibly with some step printing for some blurred effects. Maybe some out of phase shutter as well. I would love our budget to extend to a final grade after the edit but I think I am going to be limited to a best light.
I haven't shot much film before but my main work is as a 2nd AC on features. All help and suggestions are much appreciated!
Thanks, Chris.
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 01:13 PM

Hi all.
I'm going to be lighting a music video in the next month or so and I have some questions regarding the stock and colour correction that I'm going to use.
The video is set in an English seaside fairground. It's going to be shot mostly from a doggicam bodymount on super 16 looking back at the singer. We will start shooting around 11ish in the morning and will continue through daylight, dusk and into night. Lighting wise I am going to key my main artist with a hand held soft source, a little over exposed, just above the camera. This will be daylight balanced. The background will be natural daylight with lots of practical illumination coming from the fairground rides and stalls. Going into night, the background will really come to life with lots of colours...etc.
My worry is regarding the cross-over from day into night. I was planning on shooting on 7218 500T with an 85 for the day stuff. I know that I could just pull it at some point and let the telecine take care of the rest, but I kind of want to do it properly and go to an 85B, then maybe an LLD before shooting clean.
What are your thoughts? Would shooting a new greyscale and macbeth as I change filters be of help in keeping a consistent colour? At what point should I start adding 1/2 or full CTO to my lighting source?
As much as I want to keep it correctly filtered, the difference in colour temperature as the sun goes down will really help with the feel of the video which will probably be cut with different times of day mixed up. I should also add that we are going to be shooting at different speeds possibly with some step printing for some blurred effects. Maybe some out of phase shutter as well. I would love our budget to extend to a final grade after the edit but I think I am going to be limited to a best light.
I haven't shot much film before but my main work is as a 2nd AC on features. All help and suggestions are much appreciated!
Thanks, Chris.


Sounds like the kind of shoot where the latitude and flexibility of the new KODAK VISION2 HD Color Scan Film 5299 / 7299 will come in handy:

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.4.4.6&lc=en

Since the film look is created using digital image processing applied at the time of transfer, precise color and tone looks of many KODAK Films can be generated from this one stock.


Check with your technical rep at Kodak's Hemel Hempstead office for details about the film and the post production choices.
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#3 Chris Clarke

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 03:42 AM

Thanks for the info John, I wasn't aware of this stock. Would you still recommend correcting the daylight part of the shoot with an 85? Also does this stock respond well to slight overexposure as the other Vision stocks do? Rating at 320 or 400 maybe?
If anyone has any thoughts on the colour correction of my light i.e. going from daylight to tungsten then I'd be grateful!

Cheers, Chris.

Edited by flyingpenguins, 31 January 2006 - 03:44 AM.

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 04:41 AM

Shoot as late as possible with the 85 filter, then pull it, and hide the transition by timing in post. It would help if the early shots in blue twilight after you've pulled the filter were lit half-blue rather than full tungsten to reduce the difference in color temp, so you can pull some blue overall.
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#5 Chris Clarke

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 05:03 AM

Shoot as late as possible with the 85 filter, then pull it, and hide the transition by timing in post. It would help if the early shots in blue twilight after you've pulled the filter were lit half-blue rather than full tungsten to reduce the difference in color temp, so you can pull some blue overall.

Thanks for the reply David.
Do you think there is a benefit in shooting a greyscale at each step to help with the grade?
I've been thinking of what to use as my source. It needs to be daylight balanced and soft, powered from a battery and hand held. I'll gel it with 1/2 CTO and then Full CTO as the light goes as you suggested. But I also need to balance the level so that I get a good exposure in my background.
When we recce the location I'll take some meter readings at different times to get an idea of where my background will be. Any advice as to what would make a good choice of light?
Thanks again!
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 12:08 PM

Do you think there is a benefit in shooting a greyscale at each step to help with the grade?


Sure, of course -- but most of time there's no time for that as the light fades -- you just shoot, shoot, shoot as fast as you can and fix the colors in post later. You need to devise a system where scrims, gels, and filters can be changed extremely quickly on the fly. You won't have time to even think carefully about it SO KEEP IT SIMPLE.
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Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

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