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Advice for a beginner


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#1 StoneRoach

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 07:25 PM

hey everybody,
I am VERY new to film but I am hoping to get into cinematography and film editing. So far the only camera i have used is a cheapo digital camera that gives me OK results. but lately i have been shopping around looking for good starter equipment on a somewhat low budget. I will mostly been filming action sports (mt. biking, skiing, etc.). the main problem is, i have no idea what im doing. so any advice you can give me on anything would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks
M-shall
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#2 Joe M

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 08:11 PM

hey everybody,
I am VERY new to film but I am hoping to get into cinematography and film editing. So far the only camera i have used is a cheapo digital camera that gives me OK results. but lately i have been shopping around looking for good starter equipment on a somewhat low budget. I will mostly been filming action sports (mt. biking, skiing, etc.). the main problem is, i have no idea what im doing. so any advice you can give me on anything would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks
M-shall


I'm new to film myself but I thought I'd throw a reply out there to see if I can help you out.

For what you want to do I'd reccommend picking up a Krasnagorsk K3 from eBay (make sure its from a reputable seller, of course), or a reflex Bolex H16. Both are fairly sturdy and cheap 16mm cameras and are great for beginners. They are both hand cranked and have short run times so I don't know if that will be a detriment to you or not.

You'll want to read up on the costs of film and processing before you leap into film as it's a LOT more expensive than shooting digital and not very practical if you're on a tight budget. I'd also reccommend scouring this forum and others to gain more knowledge. Ask lots of questions and buy some books. Exploit Google to the fullest too. I just got done with the book "Cinematography" which is an excellent introduction to film technology, lighting, and film cameras.
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#3 StoneRoach

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 09:16 PM

Thankyou so much, you have no idea how much that advice helps me.
Thanks again
M-shall
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#4 Joe M

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 09:44 PM

Thankyou so much, you have no idea how much that advice helps me.
Thanks again
M-shall


No problem.

I forgot to mention the most important part; shoot constantly. As much as you can. There is no substitute for experimentation and experience.
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Tai Audio

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Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

The Slider

Technodolly

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape