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Oscar Nominations - Best Cinematography-2006


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#1 Wendell_Greene

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 09:31 AM

2006 Oscar Nominees for Best Cinematography


BATMAN BEGINS
Wally Pfister


BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN
Rodrigo Prieto


GOOD NIGHT, AND GOOD LUCK.
Robert Elswit


MEMOIRS OF A GEISHA
Dion Beebe

THE NEW WORLD
Emmanuel Lubezki


Full List of 2006 Oscar Nominations
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#2 Matt Frank

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 10:44 AM

I would think that Brokeback Mountain is the clear favorite to win this.

Glad to see another Terrance Malick film get a cinematography nod. I think John Toll should have won for The Thin Red Line (not to take anything away from Kaminski's work)
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#3 Patrick Neary

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 12:11 PM

well, if you still drop by these forums Mr. Prieto, a huge congratulations!
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#4 Jonathan Spear

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Posted 31 January 2006 - 01:01 PM

Batman Begins!

B)
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#5 Alfred

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 12:47 AM

Sorely disappointed about Janusz’s snub
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#6 Sean Azze

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 01:04 AM

Give it to Elswit for Good Luck... B&W hasn't looked that good since Citizen Kane.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 02:29 AM

Give it to Elswit for Good Luck... B&W hasn't looked that good since Citizen Kane.


That's going too far, especially when you consider what b&w films came out after "Citizen Kane" (1941), like...

How Green Was My Valley (1941)
Casablanca (1942)
The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)
Jane Eyre (1944)
Mildred Pierce (1945)
Spellbound (1945)
Beauty and the Beast (1946)
Great Expectations (1946)
My Darling Clementine (1946)
The Fugitive (1947)
Out of the Past (1947)
Oliver Twist (1948)
The Third Man (1949)
Rashomon (1950)
Othello (1952)
Ugetsu Monogatari (1953)
On the Waterfront (1954)
Seven Samurai (1954)
Night of the Hunter (1955)
Pather Panchali (1955)
The Seventh Seal (1957)
Throne of Blood (1957)
Wild Strawberries (1957)
Touch of Evil (1958)
Psycho (1960)
Yojimbo (1961)
8 1/2 (1963)
Hud (1963)
The Trial (1963)
Dr. Strangelove (1964)
I Am Cuba (1964)
Red Beard (1965)
In Cold Blood (1967)

1970?s:
The Last Picture Show (1971)
Paper Moon (1973)
Manhattan (1979)

1980?s:
The Elephant Man (1980)
Raging Bull (1980)
Stardust Memories (1980)

I'll stop there...
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#8 Dan Adlerstein

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 02:29 AM

yes, congrats to all nominees.

I was VERY glad that Lubezki was nominated for "The New World," and I was suprised to see that he wasn't nominated for the ASC award. I thought it a stunningly beautiful movie -- beauty that is not only appropiate to, but helps create, the poetic Mallick universe.

I disagree that Prieto is the favorie for "Brokeback ... " I don't think it's coat-tails will run that far. I think the front-runner has to be Beebe for "Memoirs ..."

Isn't it interesting though the Academy's extreme bias towards period films?
Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't "American Beauty" the only movie in the last 20 years that takes place in approximately the year it was made, to win best cinematography.

Why do you think this is? I have my theories, which seem fairly obvious to me, so I'd like to hear what you all might think.
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 02:34 AM

Period movies look prettier, that's all. Often they take place before modern electrical lighting, so there is more window light, candlight, etc, plus unspoiled nature, plus the art direction and costuming are more color-coordinated. The modern world is a garish mismatch of color and artificial light. So Academy nominators and voters tend to respond more to what could be called a "cliched" notion of beauty rather than see the subtleties of cinematography in a contemporary setting.
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#10 Max Jacoby

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 03:23 AM

That's going too far, especially when you consider what b&w films came out after "Citizen Kane" (1941), like...

...and that 'Good Night, and Good Luck' is not a 'real' black & white film, but shot on color-neg.
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#11 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 03:50 AM

I have to second the disappointment with Janusz's snub. I feel all the films that are nominated look great, but Janusz's work really disserved to be in this group.

I am real happy to see Prieto, Lubezki and Pfister in there especially. Also, I would have liked to see Deakins's work on Jarhead get more acknowledgements; I thought the film looked fantastic.
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#12 Sam Wells

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 09:32 AM

...and that 'Good Night, and Good Luck' is not a 'real' black & white film, but shot on color-neg.


Well I prefer "real" B&W but if what I see on the screen is Black and White then I guess I have to say it's a Black and White film (it might not be Film either these days....)

I wanted to see Michael Chapman win for Raging Bull - but no way was it not going to go to Ghislain Cloquet - and Geoffrey Unsworth posthumously for Tess...


Ditto John Toll for The Thin Red Line - too bad Ryan was the same year...

Since The New World is the only one I've seen so far it's OK with me Emmanuel Lubezki wins !

-Sam
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#13 John Holland

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 10:58 AM

i agree , New World , anamorphic , natural light , its what is all about . john holland, london.
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#14 Simon Robinson

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 11:30 AM

The only one I have seen so far was Memoirs of a Geisha, which i didn't warm too. The depth of field was too shallow in some shots, especially when you wanted to see the sumptous production design. I much prefered Munich, but hey that got snubbed.
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